Is VB suitable for scientific computation? 
Author Message
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?

Anybody say Yes?

Shige



Fri, 16 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
yes

Carlos A. Santos            

Life is wonderful only if you know what it means! : )



Sat, 17 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
why not?

Carlos A. Santos            

Life is wonderful only if you know what it means! : )



Sat, 17 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
What do you mean by scientific?
If you don't need to do Shifts or rotates you are probably OK. Just set
optimizations to remove array bounds, overflow checks, etc. (once debugged)
Quote:

>Anybody say Yes?

>Shige



Sat, 17 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
I mean do some computation extensive work, like write an estimation procedure,
can VB do it well?

Shige

Quote:

> What do you mean by scientific?
> If you don't need to do Shifts or rotates you are probably OK. Just set
> optimizations to remove array bounds, overflow checks, etc. (once debugged)


> >Anybody say Yes?

> >Shige



Sat, 17 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
No!!!

We're currently porting some fortran programm (F77) to VB and whenever we
hit this huge calculations (15+ Digits right of the decimal
point) we get totaly different results from what Fortran gets. Has to do
with the different width of Float etc. If "the evil Empire" would support
"decimal" as a regular datatype, not just a "variant converted with CDEC",
that would be a step in the right direction.

Another problem is the lack of a solid math library with functions for
matrixes, interpolation etc. So better stick to good ole FORTRAN.

    Michael B,



Quote:
> What do you mean by scientific?
> If you don't need to do Shifts or rotates you are probably OK. Just set
> optimizations to remove array bounds, overflow checks, etc. (once
debugged)


> >Anybody say Yes?

> >Shige



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
The answer is YES.

We have developed a few of programs with very intensive engineering calculations,
such as finite element method, and finite deference method, by using VB.  VB has
some build-in functions, such as SIN and TAN, but missing some useful ones from
FORTRAN.  But you always can write your function to calculate those using the
internal function provided by VB.  With VB4 and above, there is almost no
limitation of array bound, compared with VB3.

Quote:

> I mean do some computation extensive work, like write an estimation procedure,
> can VB do it well?

> Shige


> > What do you mean by scientific?
> > If you don't need to do Shifts or rotates you are probably OK. Just set
> > optimizations to remove array bounds, overflow checks, etc. (once debugged)


> > >Anybody say Yes?

> > >Shige



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?

Quote:

> Has to do with the different width of Float etc.

VB supports all the same basic datatypes C does, including double
precision. If you're using standard floating point instead of double
precision floating point, you're likely to have problems.

It would be nice for VB to support things like Quad or ultra
precision, but realistically it would be quite difficult to for VB to
support anything that VC++ didn't, since VB is probably written in
VC++.

So, VB is no better than C, but not fundamentally worse. It may be a
little slower when looping & recursing and such.

Quote:
> If "the evil Empire" would
> support "decimal" as a regular datatype, not just a "variant
> converted with CDEC", that would be a step in the right direction.

I don't see what you mean. Double precision variables are real,
genuine double precision variables, stored in the same format as in
any other programming language. Try writing them out to a RANDOM file
type to and look at the underlying bits.

Rick R.



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
    Yes, it is... but some things can be done much more better and faster
with the additional specialized libraries (components). E.g. there is a
special matrix library (ActiveX dll), which allows to perform quick matrix
calculations in VB programs. I used it in my finite elements modeling
program, written on VB. Is this not a scientific application?

With respect, Dmitry W. Sh.



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
Would you please tell me where can I find it (the URL)?

Thanks.

Shige Song

Quote:

>     Yes, it is... but some things can be done much more better and faster
> with the additional specialized libraries (components). E.g. there is a
> special matrix library (ActiveX dll), which allows to perform quick matrix
> calculations in VB programs. I used it in my finite elements modeling
> program, written on VB. Is this not a scientific application?

> With respect, Dmitry W. Sh.



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?

Quote:
>Would you please tell me where can I find it (the URL)?

>>     Yes, it is... but some things can be done much more better and faster
>> with the additional specialized libraries (components). E.g. there is a
>> special matrix library (ActiveX dll), which allows to perform quick matrix
>> calculations in VB programs. I used it in my finite elements modeling
>> program, written on VB. Is this not a scientific application?

I would recommend downloading the Intel Performance Library from their web
site.  Very fast FFTs as well as many many many other mathematical functions.  

J. Bodie



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
I agree with you Mike.

VB is good with a lot of things, I mean many things. But when it comes to
very computation intensive tasks with high degree of accuracy, FORTRAN seems
to beat most other languages.

Most people are not aware of the advancements in Fortran 90/95.

Hey, we ultimately compile the Fortran code as a DLL and call it from VB,
right?

Get the best of both worlds.

Quote:
> No!!!

> We're currently porting some FORTRAN programm (F77) to VB and whenever we
> hit this huge calculations (15+ Digits right of the decimal
> point) we get totaly different results from what Fortran gets. Has to do
> with the different width of Float etc. If "the evil Empire" would support
> "decimal" as a regular datatype, not just a "variant converted with CDEC",
> that would be a step in the right direction.

> Another problem is the lack of a solid math library with functions for
> matrixes, interpolation etc. So better stick to good ole FORTRAN.

>     Michael B,



> > What do you mean by scientific?
> > If you don't need to do Shifts or rotates you are probably OK. Just set
> > optimizations to remove array bounds, overflow checks, etc. (once
> debugged)


> > >Anybody say Yes?

> > >Shige



Sun, 18 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Is VB suitable for scientific computation?
Hello

Quote:
>Would you please tell me where can I find it (the URL)?

The URL is: http://www.{*filter*}ax.ru/~oes/vbmthmtx.htm

This component was tested on VB5 and VB6. I can not guarantee the
compatibility with the older versions. And excuse me please for all possible
mistakes made in the description (because of my poor English).

****************

The sample of implementation:

Dim A As Variant, B As Variant, C As Variant

Private Sub Form_Load()
A = Matrix(8, 8)
For i = 1 To 8
For j = 1 To 8
A(i, j) = Rnd(1)
Next j, i
B = Inv(A) ' Inversion
C = Mul(A, B) ' Multiplication
For i = 1 To 8
For j = 1 To 8
Debug.Print Format(C(i, j), "0.###############") + " ";
Next j
Debug.Print
Next i

This code prints:
1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0,
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0,
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1,

With respect, Dmitry W. Sh



Mon, 19 Nov 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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