proprietory database 
Author Message
 proprietory database

I am working with a shop that has a proprietory database and
I want to move them to abandon this platform and adopt a more
open approach such as Access and VB.

I am looking for articles that help support my position that
a proprietory database is a dead horse.  Obviously, this is
a tough sell and I need to make reference to "expert" opinions.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Nick Becker



Tue, 27 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database

Quote:

>I am working with a shop that has a proprietory database and
>I want to move them to abandon this platform and adopt a more
>open approach such as Access and VB.
>I am looking for articles that help support my position that
>a proprietory database is a dead horse.  Obviously, this is
>a tough sell and I need to make reference to "expert" opinions.
>Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here's one reason for starters:

Unless this is a very large organization with a big programming
team, it's odd-on that there's only one or two people that really
understand this system. If they should quit or get run over by a
bus tomorrow, the company's up the creek for maintaining the
system. With any shrinkwrap type of software, you can hire
someone to replace the "guru" that supports it now.

Also, if the company should start to experience a period of
growth, the present system may not be scalable without major
trauma. An Access/VB system could be upsized to a client-server
db without nearly as much pain.

Good luck.

-----

Joe

Never underestimate the power of a WAG.



Thu, 29 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database

Quote:

>I am working with a shop that has a proprietory database and
>I want to move them to abandon this platform and adopt a more
>open approach such as Access and VB.
>I am looking for articles that help support my position that
>a proprietory database is a dead horse.  Obviously, this is
>a tough sell and I need to make reference to "expert" opinions.
>Any help would be greatly appreciated.

First, for truely "expert" opinions,  you should ask your
question in comp.lang.databases.  You will get many
serious takers there.

As far as moving a large system to Access... If you
brought that suggestion to me, I would not even
bother to listen.  For small 2-3 user apps it is fine.

Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
or Informix.


http://www.xnet.com/~kd9fb



Sat, 31 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database

Quote:

>As far as moving a large system to Access... If you
>brought that suggestion to me, I would not even
>bother to listen.  For small 2-3 user apps it is fine.

Actually, I've heard of Access being used with dozens of users
for decision support databases. It seems the practical limit is
at most a couple of dozen or so if there is any serious updating
taking place.

OTOH, I've also been told that two is one too many for Access,
although I'd have to say that's a bit of a stretch, unless one of
them is a bar code scanner or something.

Quote:
>Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
>or Informix.

Much more expensive too. He didn't indicate the size of the db or
user base. If it's a small shop, rebuilding the db in Access
wouldn't be a bad alternative. The app could later be upsized to
SQL Server, etc., without too much pain.

Joe

Never underestimate the power of a WAG.



Sat, 31 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database


: >Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
: >or Informix.

: Much more expensive too. He didn't indicate the size of the db or

Have you gotten a bid recently? Don't know about Sybase and Informix,
but Oracle and SQL Server for NT are pretty reasonable...Assuming you
have a dba. Important note: Oracle's fiscal year ends this month and
they will deal.

Jim



Sat, 31 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database

Quote:

>: >Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
>: >or Informix.
>: Much more expensive too. He didn't indicate the size of the db or
>Have you gotten a bid recently? Don't know about Sybase and Informix,
>but Oracle and SQL Server for NT are pretty reasonable...Assuming you
>have a dba. Important note: Oracle's fiscal year ends this month and
>they will deal.

Actually, we're in the process of getting bids right now. True,
the software with client licenses aren't that bad in comparison
to installing Access on all the workstations. OTOH, if you're
using VB about all you need is one copy of VB and Access for each
developer. Anyway, it's the hardware that's the *gotcha*. We
don't have a server to run it on, so we need to buy that too.
We're looking at NT/SQL Server on a variety of hardware.

Regards,

Joe

Never underestimate the power of a WAG.



Sat, 31 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database


writes:

Quote:
> For small 2-3 user apps it is fine.

>Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
>or Informix.

Access is also fine for 15-25 people depending on the amount of network
traffic.  If money is no object, buying equipment, software, and experts
for SQL(MS,Sybase,Oracle, whatever) justifies that approach, but there is
little need to spend that money for a group of users less than 10-15 in
number.

Don't get me wrong, moving from proprietory system to SQL is good idea,
but if you are having difficulty convincing anyone, they would be prone to
look at dollar amounts in addition to being convinced they need to
migrate.



Tue, 03 Nov 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database


Quote:
Garrick) writes:
> True,
>the software with client licenses aren't that bad in comparison
>to installing Access on all the workstations. OTOH, if you're
>using VB about all you need is one copy of VB and Access for each
>developer.

Same way with Access.  Use the ADT(Access Developers Toolkit) to
distribute "runtimes" to all client stations.  The only software you pay
for is for the developer.


Tue, 03 Nov 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 proprietory database

Quote:


>writes:
>> For small 2-3 user apps it is fine.

>>Much better choices, are SQL Server, Sybase, Oracle
>>or Informix.
>Access is also fine for 15-25 people depending on the amount of network
>traffic.  If money is no object, buying equipment, software, and experts
>for SQL(MS,Sybase,Oracle, whatever) justifies that approach, but there is
>little need to spend that money for a group of users less than 10-15 in
>number.
>Don't get me wrong, moving from proprietory system to SQL is good idea,
>but if you are having difficulty convincing anyone, they would be prone to
>look at dollar amounts in addition to being convinced they need to
>migrate.

Point taken.  But the original question was much broader:

Quote:
>I am working with a shop that has a proprietory database and
>I want to move them to abandon this platform and adopt a more
>open approach such as Access and VB.
>I am looking for articles that help support my position that
>a proprietory database is a dead horse.  Obviously, this is
>a tough sell and I need to make reference to "expert" opinions.
>Any help would be greatly appreciated.


http://www.xnet.com/~kd9fb


Wed, 04 Nov 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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