Fastest known sort for database access: any interest in VB implementation [updated] 
Author Message
 Fastest known sort for database access: any interest in VB implementation [updated]

Below is a copyrighted text fragment from the web site
www.cec-services.com, currently in isp host transition,  briefly describing
the Binary Sort Access Method [BSAM] (U.S. Patent Pending).  

The purpose of this article is to query readership of this usenet group as
to interest in having BSAM implemented in a Visual Basic library product
for sale at under $500.

Proprietary BSAM prototypes have been implemented in Ada83 and TrueBASIC,
among other languages.

------[ begin quote ]------------------------------------------------------

        BSAM adds keys over 45% faster and reads keys in sorted order over
400% faster than optimized B-tree methods.

        A complete, public disclosure of BSAM can not be made at this time
due to patent pending status. A non disclosure agreement is available on
request to those who qualify (excluding principals in Utah and outside the
US).  

BSAM Benefits

        Provides the fastest known key insertion and retrieval for database

access  

        Enables licensees to gain a competitive edge through use of new,
patented technology

        Offers the best cost-performance ratio for high performance
database
access

Patent Pricing
Perpetual license             $100,000
Royalty / residual            0.5%

--------[ end quote ]------------------------------------------------------

Below is also a copyrighted abstract describing BSAM.

--------[ begin quote ]----------------------------------------------------

Performance statistics for the Binary Sort Access Method [BSAM],
US patent pending  

Copyright 1996, Colin James III,  All Rights Reserved

CEC Services, LLC, 1613 Morning Drive, Loveland, CO  80538-4410

Abstract
========

The Binary Sort Access Method [BSAM], US patent pending, was tested against
B-tree for speed of adding keys in the same respective random order into
persistent data structures built from scratch, ie, not inserted into
pre-existing data structures.  

BSAM added random keys on average of about 45.2% faster than B-tree.  

BSAM retrieved a sorted list of keys on average of about 4-times faster
than B-tree.

BSAM required about 2.3-times more disk space than did B-tree.

Test results
============

.           Number of unique keys (x 1000) added in the same random
.           order to respective data structures built from scratch
.           - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
.             10   20   30   40   50   60   70   80   90  100  110
.           ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
o : BSAM    175  399  561  813  971 1154 1470 1641 1816 2231 2425
x : B-tree  239  526  826 1150 1428 1774 2075 2407   -    -    -
.           -------------------------------------------------------
.           Time in seconds for each test

.110 -                                                o  
.100 -                                            o      
. 90 -                                    o              
. 80 -                                o               x

. 70 -                             o           x            
. 60 -                      o            x                  
. 50 -                   o        x                                      
. 40 -                o     x                                        
. 30 -           o    x                                                
. 20 -       o  x                                                          
. 10 -   ox

.  0 +  ------------------------------------------------
.        1   3   5   7   9  11  13  15  17  19  21  23
.          2   4   6   8  10  12  14  16  18  20  22  24

Description of BSAM
===================

This is proprietary because of US patent pending status.  However,
potential licensees may qualify for information under a non disclosure
agreement available from the author above.

Description of BSAM test implementation
=======================================

BSAM was implemented in True BASIC Professional v 4.01.  All movement of
keys was performed by hard disk access in real time as the data base was
assumed to be fully persistent.

Description of B-tree
=====================

The B-tree variation used is best examined first hand by the reader in the
True BASIC documentation in Chapter 48, The TB-Tree Library, and in the
source code which is included in the distribution.  This particular B-tree
variation is remarkably efficient and hence exceptionally fast, much more
so in fact than that supplied with other vendors' compilers which we own.
The high quality of the TB-Tree Library attests to the fact that
professional mathematicians designed and implemented it.    

Description of B-tree implementation
====================================

Only three calls were used:  BTOpen to open the database file;  Add to
insert the keys in 8-bytes in IEEE number format;  and LoadKeys to read the
keys in sorted order.

Random key generation
=====================

The random keys to be added were unique for the range of keys.  This is
known mathematically as a random permutation  For example, if 100,000 keys
were required then 100,000 unique keys were randomly generated in the
numeric range of 1 to 100,000 such that no key was used more than once.
The random number function was seeded identically for all runs such that
the same series of random numbers was generated for 1 to the numeric limit.
True BASIC has an excellent mathematical implementation of a pseudo random
number generator [RNG].  To test quickly the quality of the RNG, we
randomly turned on pixels and noticed no streaking line patterns. (We have
found that this is a good test in two dimensions of RNGs as supplied by
other compiler vendors.)  

Acknowledgments
===============

Trademarks and their respective owners are hereby acknowledged.

--------[ end quote ]------------------------------------------------------



Thu, 08 Apr 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Fastest known sort for database access: any interest in VB implementation [updated]

Quote:

>Below is a copyrighted text fragment from the web site
>www.cec-services.com, currently in isp host transition,  briefly describing
>the Binary Sort Access Method [BSAM] (U.S. Patent Pending).  

>The purpose of this article is to query readership of this usenet group as
>to interest in having BSAM implemented in a Visual Basic library product
>for sale at under $500.

>Proprietary BSAM prototypes have been implemented in Ada83 and TrueBASIC,
>among other languages.

With VB 5.0 just around the corner, one has to ask, is this engine thread-safe
and OOP ready?

Peter Mikalajunas

http://www.xnet.com/~kd9fb



Thu, 08 Apr 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Fastest known sort for database access: any interest in VB implementation [updated]


Quote:


>With VB 5.0 just around the corner, one has to ask, is this engine thread-safe
>and OOP ready?

I've been hearing conflicting reports about VB 5.0.  Its object-oriented, it
isn't object-oriented, etc.

Does anyone know whether it IS or IS NOT OOP?  (Not just "object based".)

Rod
--
Rod Falanga
UNM's Alb. Metro Central Intake
842-1730



Sat, 10 Apr 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Fastest known sort for database access: any interest in VB implementation [updated]


Quote:



>  >With VB 5.0 just around the corner, one has to ask, is this engine
thread-safe
>  >and OOP ready?

>  I've been hearing conflicting reports about VB 5.0.  Its
object-oriented, it
>  isn't object-oriented, etc.

>  Does anyone know whether it IS or IS NOT OOP?  (Not just "object
based".)

>  Rod
>  --
>  Rod Falanga
>  UNM's Alb. Metro Central Intake
>  842-1730

VB 5.0 is supposed to be object-based and _not_ object-oriented (OO)
because it can not support multiple inheritance or programming by contract,
among other things.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Re-usable, patented financial software for business and banks
Colin James III, Principal Scientist     www.cec-services.com
CEC Services, LLC, 1613 Morning Dr, Loveland, CO   80538-4410
Telephone lines:  Voice 970.622.0466; Facsimile: 970.622.0177
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~



Sat, 10 Apr 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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