What should I start to learn... 
Author Message
 What should I start to learn...

Hello, i am 15 years old and very smart. I have
been programmin since I was 8, and basically
dropped it off and forgot some things. Anyway, I
want to start programming again because I plan to
major in programming or whatever in college and I
just want to know, should I learn QB45 or
QuickBasic or whatever it is. I mean, I know what
the program is, but I forget the name of the Real
version, which is what I have. Anyway, if I want
to learn how to program, should I start learning
on QB45 or Python? What's easier and most useful
to learn, since I'll end up learning C++
sometime.

C++ is on my computer because I had received it
as a gift from my uncle, but it is way too hard
for me now. Anyway, please reply by email if I
should learn by QB45 or Python.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.*-*-*.com/
Before you buy.



Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...
Anyway, if I want

Quote:
> to learn how to program, should I start learning
> on QB45 or Python? What's easier and most useful
> to learn, since I'll end up learning C++
> sometime.

Python?  Don't bother.  It's a dead end.  At least with QB, you'll have the
foundation for the language used as the glue that holds together the MS
Office suite.  If your ultimate goal is to get a job in programming, start
with C before going on to C++.  I'm a professional programmer and I use
dBase and MS Access exclusively.  BASIC is fun for me so I enjoy writing VBA
(Visual Basic for Access) apps.  Of course ANY programming language is good
to start you on the road to thinking logically and learning problem solving
techniques such as completely defining the problem and breaking it down into
successively smaller subtasks to be solved.

Tom Lake



Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...

Quote:

> Hello, i am 15 years old and very smart. I have
> been programmin since I was 8,

Are you describing me?
Guess not, I started when I was 7 (GWB) and I still am programing.

Quote:
> and basically
> dropped it off and forgot some things. Anyway, I
> want to start programming again because I plan to
> major in programming or whatever in college and I
> just want to know, should I learn QB45 or
> QuickBasic or whatever it is. I mean, I know what
> the program is, but I forget the name of the Real
> version, which is what I have. Anyway, if I want
> to learn how to program, should I start learning
> on QB45 or Python? What's easier and most useful
> to learn, since I'll end up learning C++
> sometime.

QB45 is good, but I don't know if it has anything to do with C, except
the END IF sentences that can look similar... ;)

Quote:
> C++ is on my computer because I had received it
> as a gift from my uncle, but it is way too hard
> for me now. Anyway, please reply by email if I
> should learn by QB45 or Python.

I think it could be ok to go for QB45, since it's mistakes will soon
encourage you to learn C. Anyway, what C are you talking about, there
are two versions, one was something like visual C or something...

It could be a good idea to go for VB if you are intending to learn the
other C...

Good luck!

--
If you ask me, a 4 byte cookie is rather big. But I don't think it
depends on my modem, it depends on how much I can bite at once... =)

V yvxr ZvpebFbsg! V ubcr lbh qba'g zvaq gur EBG13...

GTSC4 -- If nobody else wants to do it, why shouldn't we?(TM)
Http://www.geocities.com/gtsc4/index.html



Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...

Quote:

> Of course ANY programming language is good to start you on the road
> to thinking logically and learning problem solving techniques such
> as completely defining the problem and breaking it down into
> successively smaller subtasks to be solved.

Well, not quite *any* language, Tom. :-)  For example, RPG or APL
would be *horrible* first languages.  I have known programmers who
were 'ruined' for life after two or three initial years of RPG.  They
never overcame the RPG mindset enough to be good at programming other
languages.  Any normal structured procedural language, I would agree.
--

Sun Valley Systems    http://www.sunvaley.com
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that
whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life."


Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...


Quote:
> Hello, i am 15 years old and very smart. I have
> been programmin since I was 8, and basically
> dropped it off and forgot some things. Anyway, I
> want to start programming again because I plan to
> major in programming or whatever in college and I
> just want to know, should I learn QB45 or

My computer carreer is described at
http://www.hofen.ch/~andreas/Englisch/UeberMichSelbst.html. As you can see
there, I started with BASIC on a Commodore 64 (was 1985), changed later
(1988) to AmigaBASIC on a Commodore Amiga 500, 1989 started with GWBASIC and
1993 to QBASIC.EXE (that version shipped in DOS 6.22). This all was the time
before I studied computer science at the "Fachhochschule Aargau" (Swiss
university).

Today as a IT professional I use C++ too (in my company we develop storage
management systems for food industry, see
http://www.onsite.ch/html/body_leonardo.htm for more details).

During this large time, the complexity has dramatically increased. Where the
Commodore 64's technical reference fit in a book (you had good chance to
know every byte like the pocket on your trousers!), the complete Windows 98
and Windows 2000 fills a small library: It's impossible to know every detail
in the Windows API, because Microsoft has added a lot of new features and
APIs with every new Windows release.

Advice to you: Go back to the good old MS-DOS 6.22 (the DOS prompt on
Windows 98 can also be used) as learning environment.

About programming language: I would recommend BASIC as starting language
because:

- you get programmer-friendly messages like "Bad subscript" instead "General
protection fault" for which it's harder to find the origin of problem...
- the direct mode allows you "play" with unknown commands. In a compiler
language, you often have to write a small program to explore a library
function's capabilities => you get the famous success event much faster :-)

Good beginning language would be QBASIC.EXE for you because of that. Read

http://dreael.catty.ch/Deutsch/BASIC-Knowhow-Ecke/Bezug_QBASIC.html

how to get it. Note that I'm still working on this BASIC knowhow and
download corner, a French and English translation will follow later, so
please use http://babelfish.altavista.com/translate.dyn at the moment if you
don't speak German.

                  Andreas



Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...

You should start with a DOS Basic and from there go to either a SDK-style
Windows Basic or to a run-time Windows Basic. I would list them as QBasic,
QuickBasic, TrueBasic, powerbasic, and VisualBasic. PB and VB clearly have
commercial usage.

(C began as an operating system developer's utility. It was programming
shortcuts to assembly. The goal was to create the OS not to create a
programming language but libraries were built-up and added. Academic support
of C is carried onto all new college programming students who take it as a
stamp of professional exclusiv-ity. C++, Pascal, Java and others are
off-shoots of C. C++ is available as comprehensive development environments
form Borland and from MS. C++ as a comprehensive development environment
certainly guarantees its success. C and its off-shoots have much required
structure.)

(Now when a programmer writes a complex application made up of individual
programming elements, the programmer creates patterns and structures as a
natural result. A structured language is a copy of that type of natural
result but is an ordered activity rather than facilitation of the natural
activity. In other words the "machine" is in charge...)...Huh, what...?...



Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...

Quote:

> Hello, i am 15 years old ... if I want
> to learn how to program, should I start learning
> on QB45 or Python?

What you should learn next depends on what it is you wish to do with your
to-be-acquired programming skills.

But if your goal is currently (I say currently because at 15 you really
don't know yet) to secure a career as a professional programmer, let me give
you my standard advice: don't worry about *which* programming lanaguage
(within the range of the commercially viable); rather, learn all you can
about a specific industry, and start figuring out what real users in that
industry need. Spend some time working on a sales desk, or in an accounting
department or on the shipping dock - when you move into data processing,
you'll be a lot more valuable than if you are just some whiz kid who doesn't
need the on-line help file to list all the options for the printf function.

One other thing: you said...

Quote:
> What's easier ...to learn...
> C++ is on my computer because I had received it
> as a gift from my uncle, but it is way too hard
> for me now.

Whatever road you choose, it will not get easier.

--
Michael C. Mattias
Tal Systems
Racine WI



Thu, 13 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...
|>
|> What's easier and most useful
|> to learn, since I'll end up learning C++
|> sometime.

Let's see. You are 15 and you plan to major in
programming when you get to college. You used
to dabble in programming, but dropped it. You
find C++ way too hard (which is pretty natural -
it IS hard).

I say, first figure out some program you *really*
want to write. Maybe a game, or something else that
inspires you to dream about how awesome it will be
when you get done.

Then go to a technical bookstore, grab books off
the shelf and flip through them until you find one
that looks pretty good - like you might be able to
follow what it is saying. You might as well start
by looking at C++ books, since you have it already.
Look for tutorials on the web, too. Or a chat group.

If you *really* don't like C++, try some version of
BASIC, like QBasic or PowerBasic or even some freeware
BASIC off the net. Or any language that floats your boat.

But the most important thing is, programming is hard
to learn. If you don't have a great reason to learn it,
you'll drift away again, just like before. Writing a
game gives you great reason to keep slugging away at
the hard parts until you get past them.

|> Anyway, please reply by email.

Sorry. You post to a newsgroup, you come back for
your replies. That's the netiquette.

--
Brian McLaughlin, Technical Writer  |"Thanks to the Internet, misinformation
Integrated Measurement Systems, Inc.| now travels faster than ever before!"
Beaverton, OR, USA                  | ---- Standard disclaimer applies ----



Fri, 14 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...

        if u were my son
        i would initiate with :                 LOGO (free on the internet)

        if a whiz kid :                         postscript or python

        if envisage a progrmming career :       C/C++
--
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al aab, ex seders moderator                                   sed u soon
               it is not zat we do not see the  s o l u t i o n          
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+



Sat, 15 Feb 2003 03:00:00 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...
This is more or less the way I did it.
I started with BBC Basic, QuickBasic,
and turned to Visual Basic, which was
a good way for me to go. Now I am
learning C.

Some things I regard as very important:

- learn a language that is popular in your peer group,
so you can exchange experience with friends.

- the game aspect: work on a small project, that
fascinates you. So you will stay with it and in the
end you feel challenged to overcaome problems
and find solutions.

- be open minded for other languages to learn,
if necessary.

Good Luck, Stefan



Sun, 16 Feb 2003 13:03:43 GMT  
 What should I start to learn...
well, QuickBasic is QB 45.  For now, learn QuickBasic because Python is
somewhat advanced.  


Wed, 19 Feb 2003 05:24:03 GMT  
 
 [ 11 post ] 

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