System abend '0E37'? 
Author Message
 System abend '0E37'?

Hi!

I feel so lonely in this newsgroup that I can even hope got an answer.
So my question is that anybody know is a System abend '0E37'?

I'm a student that learn s/390 assembly and I think when I'll be diplomee no
company will want me... can some one tell me if the s/390 is used by some
company today?

thanks for the answer...



Fri, 08 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?

Quote:

>I feel so lonely in this newsgroup that I can even hope got an answer.
>So my question is that anybody know is a System abend '0E37'?
>I'm a student that learn s/390 assembly and I think when I'll be diplomee no
>company will want me... can some one tell me if the s/390 is used by some
>company today?

There are lots of companies using S/390.  And even if you never touch
a 390 after you graduate, you are still learning a lot about
computing.

Sorry, I don't have my manual with me, so I'm not sure what E37 is.
There was probably an error message which told you a little more.  It
has to do with EndOfVolume processing, but still leaves many
possibilities.



Fri, 08 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?
See

http://www.s390.ibm.com:80/bookmgr-cgi/bookmgr.cmd/BOOKS/IEA1H711/2%2...

and

http://www.s390.ibm.com:80/bookmgr-cgi/bookmgr.cmd/BOOKS/IEA1H421/2%2...

Basically, all "traditional" data sets in OS/390 have a set amount of
space, unlike file systems on a PC or in Unix, and all the space in the
data set filled up.  The trade off is issues like D37 and E37 ABENDs,
versus better performance.


Quote:

>>I feel so lonely in this newsgroup that I can even hope got an answer.
>>So my question is that anybody know is a System abend '0E37'?

>>I'm a student that learn s/390 assembly and I think when I'll be diplomee no
>>company will want me... can some one tell me if the s/390 is used by some
>>company today?

>There are lots of companies using S/390.  And even if you never touch
>a 390 after you graduate, you are still learning a lot about
>computing.

>Sorry, I don't have my manual with me, so I'm not sure what E37 is.
>There was probably an error message which told you a little more.  It
>has to do with EndOfVolume processing, but still leaves many
>possibilities.

-- Steve Myers

The E-mail addresses in this message are private property.  Any use of them
to  send  unsolicited  E-mail  messages  of  a  commerical  nature  will be
considered trespassing,  and the originator of the message will be  sued in
small claims court in Camden County,  New Jersey,  for the  maximum penalty
allowed by law.



Sat, 09 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?
quote from "system completion codes":
E37: The error occurred when an output operation was requested.
The data set was on a direct access or magnetic tape device. This
sysxtem completion code is accompanied by message IED032I.
 Refer to the explanation of message IEC032I for complete information
 about the task that was ended and for an explanation of the return code
 (rc in the message text) in register 15.

The explanation for IEC032I is too huge to quote, but essentially you
have run out of space on the output data set.

hth

regards Sven


Quote:
>Hi!

>I feel so lonely in this newsgroup that I can even hope got an answer.
>So my question is that anybody know is a System abend '0E37'?

>I'm a student that learn s/390 assembly and I think when I'll be diplomee
no
>company will want me... can some one tell me if the s/390 is used by some
>company today?

>thanks for the answer...



Sat, 09 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?

Abend codes frequently involve a SuperVisor Call (an SVC), but not always. The
E37 doesinvolve an SVC.

By far the majority of the instructions in your program deal with moving data
around and performing calculations. This is true if you write in assembler or a
high-level language, or even when you use a utility program.

But occasionally you want to do something that has been done bunches of times
by those who preceed you, and you do not want to reinvent the wheel (much less
re-debug the wheel), so you invoke a standard routine to do it for you.  In a
high-level language this might look like an OPEN, a READ, a WRITE, or a CLOSE
verbs. In assembler these would be macros.

Many of the basic Input/Output operations are delivered as canned routines by
the hardware vendor, being built into the machine itself. In fact for
protection, I/O operations can only be performed in supervisor mode (in
contrast to your program's problem state). So the high-level verbs or macros
resort to a SuperVisor Call (an SVC, known also as a SerVice Call).

There are many of these, they are called by a number (which is actually
hexadecimal). Such an instruction might look like

    SVC 37

It is like a punt, the operating system catches it, takes care of it and when
complete, returns control to your program.

SVC 13, for example is an OPEN.  SVC 37 is a close.

It turns out that your READs and WRITES, which ultimately are SVCs as well,
can themselves invoke a CLOSE (SVC 37) if they get into deep trouble. ((So to
avoid confusion when you try to apply these concepts to your source code, you
did not make it to _your_ source code CLOSE verb!))

"End of Volume" processing is a bit of an anachronismic term. In virtual
systems you are rarely concerned with physical limits like the actual physical
end of a tape or disk volume (but it definitely does happen sometimes).
Instead you are at the end of the logical limit permitted for that dataset.
"End of Volume" processing, sometimes abbreviate EOV, simply means the point at
which you closed the file or the royal WE closed it for you becasue it was in
trouble because of a lack of space.

There are various reasons you can run out of space, and the reason code is
returned in the abend code: the common B37, D37 and E37 reflect the reason (or
variation).

Some mainframe shops have a support program that helps take the mystery out of
these abends (I think it is called X37, a product or program name, not another
abend code).

When you get a 37 abend in a _new_ program, even as an experienced programmer,
you have an immediate hint that your program is looping infinitely (but not
necessarily). During development, programmers will often insert temporary
displays inside of loops to find a clue as to where things are going wild.

Another thing that happens early in development of a program, even for
experienced coders, is that after a few false starts, the program finally takes
off ... but the allocation on the datasets has been way too timid, and a good
run just busts past the limit.
So up the allocation in the SPACE=(...) parameter in the execution JCL.

You will learn to recognize when the abend code has an SVC in the lower two
digits and when it does not (the 0C4s and 0C7s are not reflective of SVCs, for
example).

By the way, there are many S/390s, and many well paid workers attending them.

Best Wishes,

Robert Rayhawk



Wed, 13 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?

Quote:

<SNIPPED>
>There are many of these, they are called by a number (which is actually
>hexadecimal). Such an instruction might look like

>    SVC 37

>It is like a punt, the operating system catches it, takes care of it and when
>complete, returns control to your program.

>SVC 13, for example is an OPEN.

Wrong, SVC 13 is ABEND SVC, SVC 19 (=X'13') is OPEN

Quote:
> SVC 37 is a close.

Wrong again, SVC X'37' is FEOV (Force End Of Volume), and SVC 37 (SVC X'25') is
...something else.  The CLOSE SVC is SVC 20 (=SVC X'14')

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      (BSP GmbH)                '---''(_/--'  `-'\_)

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Thu, 14 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 System abend '0E37'?
(snip)

Quote:

> >There are many of these, they are called by a number (which is actually
> >hexadecimal). Such an instruction might look like

> >    SVC 37

> >It is like a punt, the operating system catches it, takes care of it and when
> >complete, returns control to your program.

Like a punt? An SVC is a programmed interrupt.

Bill {*filter*}



Thu, 14 Mar 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 7 post ] 

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