BAL/370, really? 
Author Message
 BAL/370, really?

 I was genuinely amazed to find a newsgroup involved with BAL/370, which
 I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler
 work in that dialect and would love to work in that genre again, in any
 capacity. But is there still a viable market for 370 assembler software?

 -- Sincerely,
    Scott McCaughrin



Wed, 15 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?

Quote:

>  I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler

You can write most code in ANSI C if you can and if you want to, just as on
most other platforms.  But for OS-specific services with assembler-only
interfaces, there is no choice.  You can't exactly call malloc() and control
the combination of fetch protection, storage key, above or below, etc.  That
is just one example.




Wed, 15 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?

Quote:


>> I did considerable compiler
>> work in that dialect and would love to work in that genre again, in any
>> capacity. But is there still a viable market for 370 assembler software?

I work for an insurance company, and we have an entire policy management
system written in IBM Assembler. The language is very much alive and in wide
use. We have twelve programmers writing Assembler on a daily basis.

We use DB2, which is called from the Assembler code. DB2 maintains the
database, and the Assembler programs provide the user interface.



Sat, 18 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?
Here at Lexis-Nexis our main query system is assembly and Pascal. Nothing beats assembly for
serious server applications, IMNSHO. I imagine a lot of banks and insurance companies and
financial service bureaus are still using assembly language as well.

One think I've noticed is that it is harder and harder to find people who know assembly
language anymore. A lot of managers who once knew it are coming through but they have
been in management for over a decade.

I guess they don't teach this anymore.


: >  I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler
: You can write most code in ANSI C if you can and if you want to, just as on
: most other platforms.  But for OS-specific services with assembler-only
: interfaces, there is no choice.  You can't exactly call malloc() and control
: the combination of fetch protection, storage key, above or below, etc.  That
: is just one example.




Sun, 19 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?


Quote:

> I was genuinely amazed to find a newsgroup involved with BAL/370, which
> I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler
> work in that dialect and would love to work in that genre again, in any
> capacity. But is there still a viable market for 370 assembler software?

> -- Sincerely,
>    Scott McCaughrin

I work on HOGAN banking software used by many large BANKS. In my 10 years both
in IMS and CICS a lot of software is written in ASM. It is very powerful but
certainly requires some competency to use.

Bradley Cross

"Follow the light for it knows no wrong"



Mon, 20 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?
Quote:

>> I was genuinely amazed to find a newsgroup involved with BAL/370, which
>> I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler
>> work in that dialect and would love to work in that genre again, in any
>> capacity. But is there still a viable market for 370 assembler software?

In reply to J.McCoughrin, about his query as to whether assembler is
still viable.

I may be biased, but after many years as a s370 assembler programmer I
find that the NEED for assembler programmers is greater than ever. The
problem is that 'The Powers That Be ' are blinded by the high level
languages that offer so much - but at what cost.  The number of times
I've had to come to the rescue of siezed up COBOL  systems is just
ridiculous.
 Assembler programming tells you so much about HOW to programme and
WHY to programme in a particular way. I think that any programmer
should at least do a course in assembler so as to understand 'what is
happening'.

Assembler will ALWAYS be ne needed.

--
 Richard.

 Hucknall,  England.



Mon, 20 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?

        > I was genuinely amazed to find a newsgroup involved with BAL/370, which
        > I had been led to believe was qute obsolete. I did considerable compiler
        > work in that dialect and would love to work in that genre again, in any
        > capacity. But is there still a viable market for 370 assembler software?

---IBM has recently released its PC Server 500 System 390,
which contains the System 390 (alias 370) processor chipset and a
Pentium processor.

   The  S/370 is still going strong . . .



Tue, 21 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?

Quoting rzgorski from a message in comp.lang.asm370
   > I may be biased, but after many years as a s370 assembler programmer I
   > find that the NEED for assembler programmers is greater than ever.

A short comment: I am one of those experienced programmers, joined the
ranks in 1962, worked IBM in the field and Poughkeepsie on 0S/360,
emulators, simulators, and eventually on Sort/Merge Advanced Technology.
I have worked in assembler on every machine I've ever worked on (1401,
1440, 1410, 1620, 305 RAMAC, etc.) including PC's. I teach assembler
programming in college (S/400 and PC).
So how come I can't get a job? I am studying (and just passed Micro$oft
certification on) MS-Access, am studying VB and program in virutally
are current languages (and a bunch of obsolete ones!), you know, fortran,
COBOL, C, C++, Knowledgeman, other SQL based systems, and a variety of
databases and storage mechanisms.
While at the Federal Reserve Bank I wrote the programming standards for
the system. They worked mostly in COBOL on IMS and DB2. Everytime they
needed a "quick and dirty" to massage data (oh, no, we lost a VTOC!, etc.)
I was rolled in to code, debug, and save {*filter*}with good old assembler
code. No COBOL, no Culprit, no Easytrieve, no nuttin' (well, DataXpert
wasn't too bad) could do what assembler could do, as long as it could
be coded quickly, correctly, and maintainably. The Federal Reserve
System still uses the date routines I wrote in assembler to keep track
of open/close dates for every site in the system and calculate business
day differences. It's a bit mapped, indexed system that takes a whole
88 bytes for each year of open/closed dates for each site!
I am convinced that for most applications, including the future, all
code will be visual based, converted to C, and compiled. But for systems
work, the machine will have to be controlled at its base level -- hence
assembler.
So how come I can't get a job?
Anyway, I don't want to leave Philly, so don't offer me some fantastic
job in Denver.
Don't get me wrong, I love assembler, am not bitter, and am having more
fun now than ever (I LIKE Access/VB).
Sorry for this post being so long, I don't like to read giant ramblings
either.
Gary

"640K ought to be enough for anybody." - Bill Gates, 1981

Rainbow V 1.17.5 for Delphi - Test Drive



Thu, 23 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?

Quote:

>Quoting rzgorski from a message in comp.lang.asm370
>   > I may be biased, but after many years as a s370 assembler programmer I
>   > find that the NEED for assembler programmers is greater than ever.
>So how come I can't get a job?

That is a question I have asked myself a lot recently. My assembler
began in the early 80s, so I'm a relative newcomer compared to you.
Although I am currently in a job (as an assembler programmer), I am
keen to move on.            
Whilst assembler will allways be my first love , like anybody I have
to pay the bills. That is why I am currently doing a course in Visual
Basic - you HAVE to (try and) move with the times - in an attempt to
change jobs.
 As you say, the future is probably visual, but as soon as a 'techy'
problem is encountered, the assembler programmers become flavour of
the day. This can do wonders for your own self esteem, but you begin
to wonder about the the move away from intimate contact with the
machine.
When I said the need for assmebler programmers is greater than ever,
what I was trying to say is that the knowledge of what happens 'beyond
the compiler' SHOULD be taught to any programmer, not that there is
currently more jobs for assemblers (unfortunately). I too like where I
live, and wish that companies around here wanted my knowledge and
experience.
I don't know yet if I'm going to enjoy VB (although it is very
pretty!).  
--
 Richard.

 Hucknall,  England.



Thu, 23 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 BAL/370, really?


Quote:

> >A short comment: I am one of those experienced programmers, joined the
.
> >1440, 1410, 1620, 305 RAMAC, etc.) including PC's. I teach assembler
> >programming in college (S/400 and PC).
> >So how come I can't get a job? I am studying (and just passed Micro$oft
> >certification on) MS-Access, am studying VB and program in virutally
> >are current languages (and a bunch of obsolete ones!), you know, FORTRAN,
> >COBOL, C, C++, Knowledgeman, other SQL based systems, and a variety of
> >databases and storage mechanisms.

> My guess would be that if you tell certain people that you know how to
> program in COBOL and FORTRAN, they'll be prejudiced against you.  I
> know that would me *my* initial reaction.
> (snip)... but perhaps if I were hiring you, I'd think you were
> tied to the Iron Age, from the initial impression.

Indeed...
IMHO... (nearly) all managers are morons (ever read Dilbert?) (well,
except at my company :-) )... said managers have read in their glossy
magazines that COBOL, FORTRAN etc. are dead dead dead and anybody
from that era can't adapt to the new paradigms and technologies...
you know the kind of drivel... (ya, you and I know everything is
pretty much the same underneath but we can think, eh?). I would leave
the other stuff off and just mention the Micro$oft, C, C++ and SQL stuff,
which gets your usual pointy haired idiot all e{*filter*}d.

Or you are asking for too much money....

...CPV



Sat, 25 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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