Minor trivia question 
Author Message
 Minor trivia question

When I was a PL/I programmer I didn't always put in all the comments
I should have, but at least I tried to make the code not look too cluttered
by spacing blocks of code with blanks lines.  When I started playing with
Assembler, I noticed that no program had even one blank line, but some
thought was giving to how the listing looked with SPACE (and EJECT of
course) statements.

Now I find that the Assembler (well, HLASM, anyway) allows blank lines.
Your starter for 10: "When did blank lines become allowable?"

Just wondering....
Cheers,
Greg



Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question
: Your starter for 10: "When did blank lines become allowable?"

From IBM, HLASM 1.0.  The SLAC mods to Assembler H allowed them earlier
than that.

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Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:

>Now I find that the Assembler (well, HLASM, anyway) allows blank lines.
>Your starter for 10: "When did blank lines become allowable?"

In VSE/ESA, blank lines were not allowed until we finally got the High Level
Assembler.

Mark A. Young



Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:

>When I was a PL/I programmer I didn't always put in all the comments
>I should have, but at least I tried to make the code not look too cluttered
>by spacing blocks of code with blanks lines.  When I started playing with
>Assembler, I noticed that no program had even one blank line, but some
>thought was giving to how the listing looked with SPACE (and EJECT of
>course) statements.

>Now I find that the Assembler (well, HLASM, anyway) allows blank lines.
>Your starter for 10: "When did blank lines become allowable?"

That capability is new with the High Level Assembler. That, and support
for mixed case, are, I believe, the greatest advancements in IBM
Assembler technology ever.
--
Michael Quinlan

http://www.primenet.com/~mikeq


Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:
Quinlan) writes:
>That capability is new with the High Level Assembler. That, and support
>for mixed case, are, I believe, the greatest advancements in IBM
>Assembler technology ever.

And the ability to use local names (labels) longer than 8 characters.

Mark A. Young



Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:
: Quinlan) writes:

:>That capability is new with the High Level Assembler. That, and support
:>for mixed case, are, I believe, the greatest advancements in IBM
:>Assembler technology ever.

: And the ability to use local names (labels) longer than 8 characters.

nope.  Nope.  NOPE.  I still consider *that* an abomination!  :-)

Jonesy
MainFrame since 1966



Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:

>: And the ability to use local names (labels) longer than 8 characters.

>nope.  Nope.  NOPE.  I still consider *that* an abomination!  :-)

I like being able to name fields with something I find easy to interpret, e.g.,

END_OF_MEMBER_SW DS CL1
MORE_LINES_IN_MEMBER EQU C'N'
AT_END_OF_MEMBER EQU C'Y'

  CLI  END_OF_MEMBER_SW,AT_END_OF_MEMBER
    BE  ...

instead of

ENDMEMSW DS CL1
MORELNS  EQU C'N'
ENDMEMVL EQU C'Y'

In my fortran IV days I remember 6-character variable names and 8-character
subprogram names (though I suspect the length of subprogram names and named
common names were platform-specific).

Then there was when I did some BASIC programming in freshman year at college in
1972-1973 on a DECsystem-10 where the variables could be either a litter or a
letter followed by a digit.

You would probably hate the other extreme:

  30-character identifiers for COBOL
  40-character identifiers for Easytrieve-Plus
  44-character file-ids for DASD files (VSE, and I presume MVS)
  63-character (or was that 64?) identifiers for Turbo Pascal.

We seldom use the full 30-character COBOL names and I have yet to use the full
44-character file-ids (MVS: Type-1 DSCB names) (we usually have 12-character
file-ids.)

Mark A. Young



Wed, 03 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Minor trivia question

Quote:




>> >Now I find that the Assembler (well, HLASM, anyway) allows blank lines.
>> >Your starter for 10: "When did blank lines become allowable?"

>> That capability is new with the High Level Assembler. That, and support
>> for mixed case, are, I believe, the greatest advancements in IBM
>> Assembler technology ever.

>What, even more than subscripted SET symbols, or labels longer than 8
>characters?  :-)

Your're right, especially long labels. I've been using them for so long
I must have forgotten how nice it was when they were added.
--
Michael Quinlan

http://www.primenet.com/~mikeq


Thu, 04 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

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