A request for historical information for a computer education project 
Author Message
 A request for historical information for a computer education project

#1.  An instruction reference card for the IBM S/360 40 or higher,
preferably with execution timings.   A scan of the card, or of pages from a
reference manual would do quite well.
#2.  The same information for the Univac 1050 II (which was about the last 6
bit character and the first ASCII machine produced.) Univac-Sperry Rand
offered it about 1963, between the Univac III and the Univac 1107.  It was
the beginning of the end for Univac (and Honeywell, who had offered the
"super 1401" about the same time; too little, too late.)

I once had this stuff, but 31 years has taken its toll on my filing system.

Thanks for any advice, scans, or URL's.

--



Wed, 02 Jun 2004 13:53:52 GMT  
 A request for historical information for a computer education project

Quote:

>#1.  An instruction reference card for the IBM S/360 40 or higher,
>preferably with execution timings.   A scan of the card, or of pages from a
>reference manual would do quite well.

I believe at least one is still available from IBM.

The manual is called "Functional Characteristics".

One of the 360/30, 360/40, 360/67 or 360/145 are still available.

-- glen



Wed, 02 Jun 2004 17:48:47 GMT  
 A request for historical information for a computer education project

Quote:

> #1.  An instruction reference card for the IBM S/360 40 or higher,
> preferably with execution timings.   A scan of the card, or of pages from a
> reference manual would do quite well.
> #2.  The same information for the Univac 1050 II (which was about the last 6
> bit character and the first ASCII machine produced.) Univac-Sperry Rand
> offered it about 1963, between the Univac III and the Univac 1107.  It was
> the beginning of the end for Univac (and Honeywell, who had offered the
> "super 1401" about the same time; too little, too late.)

I've got a s/360 67 reference (blue) card (not scanned tho) ... but
timings were in the AR manuals (standard 360 instruction reference
card was the greencard ... I have lots of them ... and there was a
site that had scanned some of them). There was post within past year
or so in alt.folklore.computers about some of the 360 AR manuals still
available from IBM.

greencard scan currently "404"
http://users.ticnet.com/davea/greencard/start.htm

random card refs:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#14 S/360 operating systems geneaology
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#11 Old Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#13 Old Computers
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#6 ascii to binary
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#16 360/370 instruction cycle time
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#69 what is interrupt mask register?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#71 what is interrupt mask register?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#48 PC Keyboard Relics
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#15 OS/360 (was LINUS for S/390)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#42 IBM was/is: Imitation...
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#21 High Level Language Systems was Re: computer books/authors (Re: FA:
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#15 IBM 9020 FAA/ATC Systems from 1960's
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#24 "Hollerith" card code to EBCDIC conversion
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#72 ummmmm
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#24 mainframe question
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#34 9-track tapes (by the armful)

--



Wed, 02 Jun 2004 20:37:51 GMT  
 A request for historical information for a computer education project
Thanks for the references.  I'm working on a computer course for high school
students who are already computer users.  Something to take the place of the
horrible AP Computer courses currently offered.  These AP Computer courses
are a two year course with the entire purpose being to equip the student to
pass a multiple choice test in the Language C++.  Problem analysis,
algorithms, Boolean Algebra, hardware/software/human interface, history,
future, forget it.  At my daughter's high school, the first year of the
course had 14 students; ten dropped out and did not sign up for the second
year.  The class periods are only 45 minutes long.  I've look at the
materials.  I believe that were I taking the course, I'd be forgetting
material just about as fast as it was taught.  With no real programming
projects included, any window of understanding is likely two weeks long.
Passing a national test at the end of the two year course give you three
college credit hours, but it won't really eliminate any courses if you're
going into a related field.  Never having actually done any programming, the
students will not remember anything.

The timing information is for explaining changes in programming style as
memory size grew, the number of clock cycles consumed by a single
instruction shrank, clock speed increased, and the cost ratio of computer
time to computer professional time inverted and changed by orders of
magnitude.  The request from this forum was sparked by the earlier question
posted on using a S/370 TR instruction.  At least for the Univac 1050 II
computer, there was a super Edit & Mark instruction that could accomplish
such complex operations a total execution time could approach 1 millisecond.
I just wondered if the TR instruction was possible trap like that, and that
inline coding of 80 pairs of instructions could use a hash table to
translate more quickly.  But having no timing data available, and not
remembering what instructions were available for placing single bytes in a
32-bit register in the 360 and 370, I sort of let the question pass.

I think a high school computer science course should be on the level and
serve the purpose of chemistry, physics, and biology courses: teach problem
solving, give a sense of history, and equip the student for a world we can't
even imagine.  Tentative working title:  "Syntax and Grammar for People and
Machines"; explicitly defined languages like Latin being supplanted by
languages such as English where context replaces explicit signifiers; that
change related to the difference between computer systems (today) and
people.  Nuggets such as "There will be algebra used in this course; some of
you may see that as bad news; well, for you, the good news is that this
algebra uses only two numbers, 0 and 1."

Comments are welcome.  One reason I feel driven toward what I think may be a
thankless task is the way in which I was lucky enough to be introduced to
computers.  It was 1965.  My class had five students and three teachers.
Each teacher was a Sperry-Rand/Univac systems engineer, systems analyst, or
programmer.  Eight hours per day, for three weeks we wrote routines and
coded algorithms.  At the end of three weeks, each of us had to come up with
a module of code that would be a permanent part of the computing system
established covering multiple locations of a large company.  The eight of us
worked together for the next year, implementing the entire system, from
system analysis to attempting a real operating system.  The machine is long
gone, and many paradigms have changed, but the approach to problem solving
remains.  That approach has been useful in most of the projects I've ever
done (most of which have involved television news journalism, terrestrial or
satellite microwave communication, and incredibly strange computer networks
in wars, jungles, and deserts.)  Everything is logistics.  War, television,
computers;  how to get something from here to there without interfering with
something else, checking to make sure that the expected happened, recovery
from errors, and the flexibility built in to the design to allow for changes
as the plan meets reality.



Quote:

> > #1.  An instruction reference card for the IBM S/360 40 or higher,
> > preferably with execution timings.   A scan of the card, or of pages
from a
> > reference manual would do quite well.
> > #2.  The same information for the Univac 1050 II (which was about the
last 6
> > bit character and the first ASCII machine produced.) Univac-Sperry Rand
> > offered it about 1963, between the Univac III and the Univac 1107.  It
was
> > the beginning of the end for Univac (and Honeywell, who had offered the
> > "super 1401" about the same time; too little, too late.)

> I've got a s/360 67 reference (blue) card (not scanned tho) ... but
> timings were in the AR manuals (standard 360 instruction reference
> card was the greencard ... I have lots of them ... and there was a
> site that had scanned some of them). There was post within past year
> or so in alt.folklore.computers about some of the 360 AR manuals still
> available from IBM.

> greencard scan currently "404"
> http://users.ticnet.com/davea/greencard/start.htm

> random card refs:
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/98.html#14 S/360 operating systems geneaology
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#11 Old Computers
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/99.html#13 Old Computers
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000b.html#6 ascii to binary
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2000g.html#16 360/370 instruction cycle time
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#69 what is interrupt mask register?
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001.html#71 what is interrupt mask register?
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001b.html#48 PC Keyboard Relics
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001c.html#15 OS/360 (was LINUS for S/390)
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001d.html#42 IBM was/is: Imitation...
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001e.html#21 High Level Language Systems was

Re: computer books/authors (Re: FA:

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#15 IBM 9020 FAA/ATC Systems from
1960's
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#24 "Hollerith" card code to EBCDIC
conversion
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001h.html#72 ummmmm
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001l.html#24 mainframe question
> http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001m.html#34 9-track tapes (by the armful)

> --




Thu, 03 Jun 2004 07:40:33 GMT  
 A request for historical information for a computer education project
<posted & mailed>

I'm sending this by mail rather than posting since I don't want to
inflict my rather severely off-topic musings on comp.lang.asm370, a
group I don't regularly read (I'm reading your posting in
alt.folklore.computers).

On Saturday 15 December 2001 18:40, Phil Weldon

Quote:
> I think a high school computer science course should be on the level
> and serve the purpose of chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
> teach problem solving, give a sense of history, and equip the
> student for a world we can't
> even imagine.  Tentative working title:  "Syntax and Grammar for
> People and Machines";

Catchy title!  I like it.

Quote:
> explicitly defined languages like Latin being
> supplanted by languages such as English where context replaces
> explicit signifiers;

I'm not quite sure what you mean by this. (Maybe something to do
difference between "analytical" and "synthetic" morphologies?)  
However, I do have the sneaking feeling that if you aired your ideas
over on sci.lang, where folks really learned in the science of
linguistics are wont to gather, you might get some pointers towards
developing quite a sophisticated understanding of the issues you are
raising.

In any event, I am puzzled by the idea that English is in some way
generally lacking "explicit signifiers" that Latin possesses.  It's
equally easy to argue in the other direction -- for example, to come
up with examples of Latin sentences that can't be rendered into
idiomatic English without the English version supplying explicit
information that provided only by context in the Latin.  (Just about
any sentence with an ablative absolute in it will do; or even just a
third-person possessive adjective, where English explicitly expresses
the gender of the possessor but Latin does not.)

Quote:
> that change related to the difference between
> computer systems (today) and
> people.  

IS that change (if it has actually happened) related to that
difference?  I guess the best sort of course would be one where the
students are guided toward developing the intellectual tools needed
to discuss questions like this.

--
Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.


spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.



Fri, 04 Jun 2004 10:15:41 GMT  
 A request for historical information for a computer education project
#1.  Gory detail - it's a paragraph, an example of pitfalls, the rabbit and
the hare. An introduction to  "Things Are Not What They Seem", a
continuation of RISC/CISC, and a peek at why so many programs today have so
many bugs.

#2.  Most of the rest of that section is an explanation of why I could not
comment on a prior thread, though my reaction was to question the use of
instructions such as TR. It is a much deeper question than comparing
instruction times; it is perhaps a metaphor for SDI; hundreds of cheap,
simple instructions besting a leviathan that turns nanoseconds into a
churning wake.

#3.  This is not meant to be a business skills class.  Would you omit
Newtonian physics from a Physics class?

#4.  A programming class is what AP computer course are now, and a very bad
one at that: two years of instruction to pass a multiple-choice test, with
very little actual programming done over the two years.  Learning a
programming language is like taking a typing course.  It is a technical
skill, and can be taught in a few weeks.  Problem solving is a life long
education.  Along the way you pick up the skills you need.  Learning a real
programming language is of no use if you are not going to use it.  And very,
very boring.

#5.  Human communication is multi-channel, redundant, and highly contextual.
Everything a programming language is not at this moment.  Think procedural,
strongly typed, rigid syntax, abstract symbols.  Are humans going to change
to meet the communication needs of computers, or computers to meet the
communication needs of humans?

#6.  I don't know your age, nor when you graduated from high school, but
high school students ARE taking philosophy courses, and calculus, and
physics courses based on calculus.  And four years of a language; a
programming class does not hold the interest of these students, nor provide
a viable business skill for other students.

#7.  Boolean Algebra, realized in silicon, equals a computer. This is not a
programming class.

#8.  The concepts I have mentioned in passing are the stuff of education,
the world, and high school.  Really learning and using a programming
language well requires a supportive environment, one with experienced
programmers, analysts, and project managers, none of whom exist in high
school.

#9.  Now college is a place to learn a programming language; at a minimum,
if you go to a university, you have the graduate students and post docs as a
pool of experience programmers, and hopefully some teachers that offer a
reason for learning a programming language.

I may not have many disagreements with you about the best way to learn and
use a programming language effectively.  It is just that I don't believe
high school is the context for learning that skill.

By the way, my high school years were 1958-1962; I figure the top ten
percent of high school students are about 2 1/2 to 3 years ahead of me at
graduation time.


Quote:

> x-no-archive: yes

> Per PW's post

> > The timing information is for explaining changes in programming style as
> > memory size grew, the number of clock cycles consumed by a single
> > instruction shrank, clock speed increased, and the cost ratio of
computer
> > time to computer professional time inverted and changed by orders of
> > magnitude.

> I don't know if it is necessary to go into all sorts of{*filter*}detail
> about timing then and now; it might be confusing to the students.
> Suffice it to say that computers today run a lot faster than in the
> past.  It gets even more comfusing when comparing two different
> architectures.  If you could compare a simple instruction, ie a
> Branch, and its execution time on a S/360 vs. today's S/390, that
> ought to be more than enough.

> > I just wondered if the TR instruction was possible trap like that, and
that
> > inline coding of 80 pairs of instructions could use a hash table to
> > translate more quickly.  But having no timing data available, and not
> > remembering what instructions were available for placing single bytes in
a
> > 32-bit register in the 360 and 370, I sort of let the question pass.

> I would not recommend including this discussion in a high school
> course.  I would definitely NOT mix various antique machine types
> (Univac and IBM), that will only be very confusing.

> >  Tentative working title:  "Syntax and Grammar for People and
> > Machines"; explicitly defined languages like Latin being supplanted by
> > languages such as English where context replaces explicit signifiers;
that
> > change related to the difference between computer systems (today) and
> > people.

> Frankly, to me, that title seems very confusing.  I don't understand
> the relevance of "context replaces explicit signifiers" to being
> able to write a computer program.

> The best programmer courses I've had focused on explaining the
> instruction--how it was coded, what options were available with it,
> and what could be done with it.  It started out simple and worked its
> way to complex, building on the foundation as it went along.

> Your course title sounds more appropriate for a college philosophy
> department, not high school kids.

> > Nuggets such as "There will be algebra used in this course; some of
> > you may see that as bad news; well, for you, the good news is that this
> > algebra uses only two numbers, 0 and 1."

> I do believe any reasonable course in computer programming and problem
> solving requires a basic understanding of algebra.  Knowing a formula,
> the concept of variables and constants, and a little bit of manipulating
> the formula to get answer (ie 6 = x + 2, what is x?) will help the kids
> understand programming better.

> As to binary, I'm not sure if you need that in a class, other than
> in passing.  Today's application programmers normally do not use
> binary nor hex unless they're debugging something wrong or getting
> into systems programming.

> >  Everything is logistics.  War, television,
> > computers;  how to get something from here to there without interfering
with
> > something else, checking to make sure that the expected happened,
recovery
> > from errors, and the flexibility built in to the design to allow for
changes
> > as the plan meets reality.

> You are describing THREE different courses.  The first thing people have
> to learn is how the program in a given language--to take the desired
> finished product (ie a printed report), the specifications (available
> input and calculation formulas) and translate that into a working
> and accurate computer program.    It is very confusing if you try
> to introduce a broader picture when someone is just trying to learn
> a language code.

> The second issue is analysis--taking a vague problem and converting
> it to a good specification for a programmer.  This is a major project
> in itself, in terms of interviewing, research, and problem definition.
> The analyst has to define, in specific unambiguous terms, what the
> problem is and how it will be solved; then write specs.

> The third issue is even more advanced, the logistics.  I think that's out
> of scope for high school kids.

> I realize this plan is for experienced computer users and advanced
> placement kids (AP, right?).  But still you must recognize that these
> kids don't have the real world experience {*filter*}s have and are getting,
> nor the other coursework from school to let them truly understand
> the big picture.  Indeed, some college seniors have trouble with
> understanding it.



Sat, 05 Jun 2004 06:10:52 GMT  
 
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