MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros 
Author Message
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
of course 8^)?

TIA!

--
Bob LaGesse                                             Senior Software Engineer
LEXIS-NEXIS                                                (513)865-7384 (voice)
P.O. Box 933                                                 (513)865-1655 (fax)



Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

They come with High Level Assembler

Quote:

> Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
> MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
> that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
> constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
> there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
> structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
> Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
> of course 8^)?

> TIA!

> --
> Bob LaGesse                                             Senior Software Engineer
> LEXIS-NEXIS                                                (513)865-7384 (voice)
> P.O. Box 933                                                 (513)865-1655 (fax)




Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros



  This is not completely correct. The structured macros (IF, THEN, ELSE ...)
are part of the High level Assembler ToolKit. We have ordered this toolkit for
just this purpose. The HLA ToolKit can be acquired for a One Time Charge (OTC)
of $4750. If more info is required, I can email the IBM Announcement for the
toolkit.

  I know of no shareware/freeware versions of any structured macros. Maybe
someone else does.

:>
:>
:>They come with High Level Assembler
:>
:>>
:>> Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
:>> MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
:>> that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
:>> constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
:>> there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
:>> structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
:>> Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
:>> of course 8^)?
:>>
:>> TIA!
:>>
:>> --
:>> Bob LaGesse                                             Senior Software Engineer
:>> LEXIS-NEXIS                                                (513)865-7384 (voice)
:>> P.O. Box 933                                                 (513)865-1655 (fax)

------------------------
Larry G. Nottingham

------------------------



Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:



>   This is not completely correct. The structured macros (IF, THEN, ELSE ...)
> are part of the High level Assembler ToolKit. We have ordered this toolkit for
> just this purpose. The HLA ToolKit can be acquired for a One Time Charge (OTC)
> of $4750. If more info is required, I can email the IBM Announcement for the
> toolkit.

>   I know of no shareware/freeware versions of any structured macros. Maybe
> someone else does.

I think that there are some structured programming macros that come with
VM/ESA-CMS.
--
---

Beyond Software, Inc.      http://www.beyond-software.com
"The Mainframe/Internet Company"


Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:

>   I know of no shareware/freeware versions of any structured macros. Maybe
> someone else does.

They were originally called the "CONCEPT14" macro set. And you
could (I think) get them off the CBT tape (?) or one of several
universities. I *know* that Northern Illinois University was one
of them that would cut you a tape for a minimal charge.

And yes Larry, they were essentially free! All you paid for was
the time to make the tape; which the requestor had to provide.

Ciao,
B.



Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:

> Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
> MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
> that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
> constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
> there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
> structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
> Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
> of course 8^)?

> TIA!

> --
> Bob LaGesse                                             Senior Software Engineer
> LEXIS-NEXIS                                                (513)865-7384 (voice)
> P.O. Box 933                                                 (513)865-1655 (fax)


It has been a while but if I remember correctly, you can get these off
of the cbt or naspa tapes.


Sat, 23 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

I also used similar macro's some years ago.
Also, there are some similar macro's that come with the IMS database
maclib.
But while I loved them, I also hated how slow it made the compiles.
There were also limitations to which opcodes you could use.
(you couldn't invoke macros within a conditional statement)

So, I wrote a preprossessor that did more what I wanted.
It has the structure of

   IF "CLC OP1,OP2",NE,OR,"CLI OP1,'C"",EQ
        DO WHILE,"LCALL ROUTINE",R15,Z
            ...
        ENDDO
   ENDIF

and its very fast.

I'd be glad to trade a forever license to use it in exchange for a
little test time on a OS/390 machine.

Rick Plotke

Quote:
>Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
>MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
>that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
>constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
>there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
>structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
>Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
>of course 8^)?

>Bob LaGesse                                         Senior Software Engineer
>LEXIS-NEXIS                                            (513)865-7384 (voice)
>P.O. Box 933                                                     (513)865-1655 (fax)




Sun, 24 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros


Quote:

>Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
>MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
>that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
>constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
>there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
>structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
>Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
>of course 8^)?

>TIA!

>--
>Bob LaGesse                                         Senior Software Engineer
>LEXIS-NEXIS                                            (513)865-7384 (voice)
>P.O. Box 933                                                     (513)865-1655 (fax)


JES328X was written using them.  I've seen them floating around, but since I don't
like them I've never bothered to grab a copy.  I can't understand code written with
them!  (Ah, but maybe I can't understand code written without them either....)

Greg



Sun, 24 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:


> >Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
> >MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
> >that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
> >constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
> >there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
> >structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
> >Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
> >of course 8^)?

> >TIA!

> >--
> >Bob LaGesse                                            Senior Software Engineer
> >LEXIS-NEXIS                                               (513)865-7384 (voice)
> >P.O. Box 933                                                (513)865-1655 (fax)

> JES328X was written using them.  I've seen them floating around, but since I don't
> like them I've never bothered to grab a copy.  I can't understand code written with
> them!  (Ah, but maybe I can't understand code written without them either....)

> Greg

My feelings exactly. When I worked on the Xpediter product at Compuware
(written with more darned macros then I knew existed) someone referred
to the source code as "CIC" Compuware Imitation C, pronounced "sick".
Some people liked them, but I didn't.
--
---

Beyond Software, Inc.      http://www.beyond-software.com
"The Mainframe/Internet Company"


Sun, 24 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:

> > >Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
> > >MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code

> > JES328X was written using them.  I've seen them floating around, but since I don't
> > like them I've never bothered to grab a copy.  I can't understand code written with
> > them!  (Ah, but maybe I can't understand code written without them either....)

> My feelings exactly. When I worked on the Xpediter product at Compuware
> (written with more darned macros then I knew existed) someone referred
> to the source code as "CIC" Compuware Imitation C, pronounced "sick".
> Some people liked them, but I didn't.

  Those macros are for people that want to pretend that they're ALC
programmers but they can't qualify to even be COBOL programmers. I did a
contract for a product that was about half straight ALC and half those
macros. If I'd known about the macros I wouldn't have taken the job.
Wound up leaving early anyhow because of other things that came up. Such
is life. ;-)

--

Gary Kauper



Mon, 25 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:

> >> My feelings exactly. When I worked on the Xpediter product at Compuware
> >> (written with more darned macros then I knew existed) someone referred
> >> to the source code as "CIC" Compuware Imitation C, pronounced "sick".
> >> Some people liked them, but I didn't.

> >  Those macros are for people that want to pretend that they're ALC
> >programmers but they can't qualify to even be COBOL programmers. I did a
> >contract for a product that was about half straight ALC and half those
> >macros. If I'd known about the macros I wouldn't have taken the job.
> >Wound up leaving early anyhow because of other things that came up. Such
> >is life. ;-)

> I've had years of ALC without such macros and years of ALC with such
> macros.

> I can say with certainty that using the macros (as well as others that
> were developed to give ALC a more 'C' like environment) more than
> doubled the programmer's productivity.  It easily halved the number of
> bugs and allowed  the accomplishment of more complicated algorithems.
> You can sit there and say
> "I don't need no stinking high level languages" all you want, but when
> getting the job done counts, you should either sit back and be quiet
> or learn how to use the tools available to you.

> Rick Plotke


Rick,

I couldn't agree more. There are times to use a high level language and
there are times to use assembler.

Writing a bunch of macros to make assembler look like a high level
language seems to me to be an exercise in futility. If the task can be
accomplished in a high level language, by all means do so. When I write
assembler it is usually for small routines that are called from a high
level language (REXX, COBOL, PL/I, C, etc.).

One of the problems with macros is that you lose control of the
registers. I spent a great deal of time recently debugging a program
where the bug was nothing more than the fact that the CALL macro damaged
R0. When calling IRXEXCOM to set REXX variables from assembler, R0
should be pointing at the ENVBLOCK. The CALL macro can't handle that.
The following code fragment is broken but it is not obvious:

     L     R0,AENVBLOCK
     L     R15,ENVBLOCK_IRXEXTE
     L     R15,IRXEXCOM-IRXEXTE(R15)
     CALL  (15),(IRXECOML,0,0,SHVBLOCK),VL,MF=(E,PARM_LIST)

The other thing that I did not like about the "Compuware Imitation C"
macros was that they sometimes crashed the assembler. It was easier to
avoid the macros then APAR the assembler. I have tremendous respect for
the author of those macros. I have *NEVER* been able to crash the
assembler.


Beyond Software, Inc.      http://www.beyond-software.com
"The Mainframe/Internet Company"



Mon, 25 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:
>> My feelings exactly. When I worked on the Xpediter product at Compuware
>> (written with more darned macros then I knew existed) someone referred
>> to the source code as "CIC" Compuware Imitation C, pronounced "sick".
>> Some people liked them, but I didn't.
>  Those macros are for people that want to pretend that they're ALC
>programmers but they can't qualify to even be COBOL programmers. I did a
>contract for a product that was about half straight ALC and half those
>macros. If I'd known about the macros I wouldn't have taken the job.
>Wound up leaving early anyhow because of other things that came up. Such
>is life. ;-)

I've had years of ALC without such macros and years of ALC with such
macros.

I can say with certainty that using the macros (as well as others that
were developed to give ALC a more 'C' like environment) more than
doubled the programmer's productivity.  It easily halved the number of
bugs and allowed  the accomplishment of more complicated algorithems.
You can sit there and say
"I don't need no stinking high level languages" all you want, but when
getting the job done counts, you should either sit back and be quiet
or learn how to use the tools available to you.

Rick Plotke



Mon, 25 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

On Thu, 08 May 1997 09:02:39 -0700, "Wayne L. Beavers"

Quote:

>I couldn't agree more. There are times to use a high level language and
>there are times to use assembler.

>Writing a bunch of macros to make assembler look like a high level
>language seems to me to be an exercise in futility. If the task can be
>accomplished in a high level language, by all means do so. When I write
>assembler it is usually for small routines that are called from a high
>level language (REXX, COBOL, PL/I, C, etc.).

You're right.
Writing mainframe software in 'C' was twice again as productive as the

modified ALC.

But I stiff find myself from time to time *having* to write routines
in ALC, and sometimes they are very algorithmicly intensive.
This is where the Macro's (or a pre-processor) realy shines.

Quote:

>One of the problems with macros is that you lose control of the
>registers. I spent a great deal of time recently debugging a program
>where the bug was nothing more than the fact that the CALL macro damaged
>R0. When calling IRXEXCOM to set REXX variables from assembler, R0
>should be pointing at the ENVBLOCK. The CALL macro can't handle that.
>The following code fragment is broken but it is not obvious:

>     L     R0,AENVBLOCK
>     L     R15,ENVBLOCK_IRXEXTE
>     L     R15,IRXEXCOM-IRXEXTE(R15)
>     CALL  (15),(IRXECOML,0,0,SHVBLOCK),VL,MF=(E,PARM_LIST)

Like in any language, you have to know what's happening.
More than once I've been suprized by a language feature in 'C' or
'COBOL' (ie. I didn't know it worked that way and it caused bugs).

Quote:
>The other thing that I did not like about the "Compuware Imitation C"
>macros was that they sometimes crashed the assembler. It was easier to
>avoid the macros then APAR the assembler. I have tremendous respect for
>the author of those macros. I have *NEVER* been able to crash the
>assembler.

(Big Smile)

Quote:

>Beyond Software, Inc.      http://www.beyond-software.com
>"The Mainframe/Internet Company"

Rick Plotke



Mon, 25 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros



writes:
:>
:>Some time ago I used to do programming for an organiztion that had a set of
:>MVS Assembler structured programming macros which allowed me to write code
:>that was (IMHO) much cleaner and easier to understand.  It included such
:>constructs as IF/THEN/ELSE, WHILE loops, etc.  My question is whether
:>there's any shareware macro libraries floating around which supports
:>structured programming while programming in MVS Assembler language?
:>Perhaps, even IBM themselves have something like this available (for free
:>of course 8^)?

The CBT tape has (at least) two sets of
structured-programming macros:

1. one from CLEMSON University on files 107/108
2. the CONCEPT 14 macros mentionned earlier in file 316

You can download them using anonymous FTP from:

        ftp://ftp.nascom.com/library/cbt

There have been numerous sets of SP macros written over the
last 25 years, some of them quite popular.  I have the HLASM
Toolkit but I've not looked at the set it contains, not do I
remember enough of the ones I saw in JES328X years ago to be
sure they're the same.  

I know a large company here on the East coast of the US
which has a large application (at least 4000 assembler
programs) that extensively uses a set of SP macros which, if
I'm not mistaken, one of their programmers got from a
university.

I used SP macros for a few years in the early 1980s and
abandonned them mostly for reasons of performance.  I've
seen too much horrible spaghetti-code to agree with those
who flame SP macros and their users: programs written with
SP macros are generally easier to understand than those that
aren't.

Just my $.02



Mon, 25 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 MVS Assmbler Structured Programming Macros

Quote:

> Personally, coding BXLE, BCTR, and BALR give me plenty of room for
> pseudocode on the rest of the line. A nice 'comment block' formed with
> the usual rectangle of asterisks to describe an 'ENTIRE FUNCTION which
> follows' gives the listing a 'higher language' look and feel.

> Maintenance ? Addressability, CSECTS and DSECTS separate those who can
> from those who cannot.

> Usable macros ? The presupplied ones from IBM ... OPENR, CLOSER,
> GETMAIN, FREEMAIN ... et cetera, ad finitum, whose code expands on
> demand ... are just fine.

> Need more ? Just plug in the CICS and/or IMS preprocessors and you're in
> business.

> Inheritance ? Polymorphism ? Dynamic Binding ? HAR HAR HAR HAR HAR !!!!

> Burt

The purpose of higher level languages is to make better programmers out
of poorer ones. That approach doesn't work either. I agree with you.


Tue, 02 Nov 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 20 post ]  Go to page: [1] [2]

 Relevant Pages 

1. Dylan program structure and macro parsing

2. Dylan program structure and macro parsing

3. State macro in MVS

4. TIME Macro Expansion MVS/ESA

5. SPLEVEL macro (MVS and OS/390)

6. mvs assembler stow macro pds add member not working

7. execute / list forms of MVS system macros

8. MVS/XA Assembler Macro

9. Macro to dump a piece of core and the registers MVS/XA

10. Mapping macro IHALLT (MVS/XA)

11. Macro and REXX on MVS

12. MVS REXX ISREDIT macro

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software