Your favorite computer trading card? 
Author Message
 Your favorite computer trading card?


Quote:
>I'm just being silly here...but if you had to pick a single person who
>would be your favorite computer person (ie inventor like Herman Hollerith
>or Eckert & Machuley, or businessmen like Thomas Watson Jr & Sr, or
>whoem), who would you pick?

Dr. Frederick Brooks, author of "the Mythical Man Month."

Every idea in that book is 100% applicable today, even though the
book dates from the mainframe era.



Thu, 03 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:

> I'm just being silly here...but if you had to pick a single person who
> would be your favorite computer person (ie inventor like Herman Hollerith
> or Eckert & Machuley, or businessmen like Thomas Watson Jr & Sr, or
> whoem), who would you pick?

> (This could be for any reason, most talented, best contribution, most
> respected, whatever.)

Alan Touring, who made the whole thing work.

Quote:

> Mine would be Thomas J. Watson Sr.  He took a rag tag company of butcher
> scales and turned it into an empire.  He set high standards of business
> salesmanship 75 years ago that companies today still haven't mastered.
> He turned the company over to his son, but only after tempering his
> son and ensuring that he truly understood the business and was ready.

Public perceptions is wonderful. Watson was partners with Patterson of
NCR.
Read the goverment concent decrees to see just how "high standards" this
white collared mafia members were.

PS Sr. was convinced that a half dozen computers would satisfy the needs
   of the world. In many ways he was very short sighted.

PPS I got to hear a couple of his world wide staff meeting speeches. He
    was, in some ways, a nut.



Thu, 03 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

I'm just being silly here...but if you had to pick a single person who
would be your favorite computer person (ie inventor like Herman Hollerith
or Eckert & Machuley, or businessmen like Thomas Watson Jr & Sr, or
whoem), who would you pick?

(This could be for any reason, most talented, best contribution, most
respected, whatever.)

Mine would be Thomas J. Watson Sr.  He took a rag tag company of butcher
scales and turned it into an empire.  He set high standards of business
salesmanship 75 years ago that companies today still haven't mastered.
He turned the company over to his son, but only after tempering his
son and ensuring that he truly understood the business and was ready.



Thu, 03 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:


> > I'm just being silly here...but if you had to pick a single person who
> > would be your favorite computer person (ie inventor like Herman Hollerith
> > or Eckert & Machuley, or businessmen like Thomas Watson Jr & Sr, or
> > whoem), who would you pick?

> > (This could be for any reason, most talented, best contribution, most
> > respected, whatever.)

> Alan Touring, who made the whole thing work.

My choice would be Richard Feynman. Who, even as a physicist working
on the Manhattan Project, was the first [known] to postulate about the
possibilities of parrallel processing...


Fri, 04 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:

> > Read the goverment concent decrees to see just how "high standards" this
> > white collared mafia members were.

> There were some business practices of Watson in the early days that are
> not considered proper by today's standards.  However, all companies at the
> time practiced them.  For instance, Watson mandated use of IBM supplied cards
> in his machines.  Remington Rand had the same prohibition, and BOTH got
> the government angry.

How about thugs to beat up competitors' customers? How about throwing
sand
into competitors machines? How about building an intentionally defective
cash register with NCR on it to destroy his now arch enemy, Patterson?

Read the concent decrees. Both Patterson and Watson belonged in jail.

Quote:
> Watson was also developing a tape processing computer, which was put aside
> when the Korean War came out.  

In 1960 Librascope had the RPC 9000, a tape machine. Watson watched any
possible source of competition.

Further, they were studying automating card

Quote:
> processing, again which was deferred by the Korean War, and wasn't
> released until later, as the 650, which was a huge success.

650 was much earlier than that.


Fri, 04 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:


> > > Read the goverment concent decrees to see just how "high standards" this
> > > white collared mafia members were.

> > There were some business practices of Watson in the early days that are
> > not considered proper by today's standards.  However, all companies at the
> > time practiced them.  For instance, Watson mandated use of IBM supplied cards
> > in his machines.  Remington Rand had the same prohibition, and BOTH got
> > the government angry.

> How about thugs to beat up competitors' customers? How about throwing
> sand
> into competitors machines? How about building an intentionally defective
> cash register with NCR on it to destroy his now arch enemy, Patterson?

> Read the concent decrees. Both Patterson and Watson belonged in jail.

> > Watson was also developing a tape processing computer, which was put aside
> > when the Korean War came out.

> In 1960 Librascope had the RPC 9000, a tape machine. Watson watched any
> possible source of competition.

> Further, they were studying automating card
> > processing, again which was deferred by the Korean War, and wasn't
> > released until later, as the 650, which was a huge success.

> 650 was much earlier than that.

Two points, Watson Sr's business practices also included:

        a. buying up & destroying used equipment;
        b. refusing to sell equipment outright

The point was to control the marketplace by eliminating a secondary
market for used equipment. In the (in)famous 1956 Consent Decree IBM
denied any wrongdoing and agreed not to do it anymore (which, I
understand, is typical for a consent decree).

Second point concerns the IBM 650 - I participated in a summer program
in 1958 which included 2 weeks programming IBM's latest & greatest at
their Hartford (Conn) Datacenter - it was a 650. I don't believe it had
been on the market for very long. IBM's first commercially available
computer was the IBM 701, announced in 1951 (I think). It had a 10,000
word drum memory, 10 char/word, and part of each instruction was the
address of the next instruction (i.e., it wasn't automatically the next
word). Thus, it wasn't a true computer according to the von Neuman
model.

I would vote for someone like Alan Turing, Babbidge, von Neuman, maybe
Grace Hopper, Ada (Lady Byron?) or John someone (from IBM, who came up
with fortran) on the software side. Watson, Jr. & other IBM executives
had to shanghai the company away from Watson, Sr., who believe the
entire country needed only 6-12 computers around the USA to which
scientists could bring their data for computation - he believed IBM's
future lay in punched card equipment.

Hope you find the above interesting,
Bill {*filter*}



Sat, 05 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:
> My choice would be Richard Feynman. Who, even as a physicist working
> on the Manhattan Project, was the first [known] to postulate about the
> possibilities of parrallel processing...

Without a doubt, Feynman made a great many contributions to all fields
of science and humanity.

Feynman did great with the crude punch card multipliers available at the
time.  He figured out how to maximize computing productivity and error
control.

Read his book, "Surely You're joking Mr. Feynman", it's great!

Someone else just came out with a new biography.

The one thing about Feynman's background I never understood is why the
brass (ie General Groves) at Los Alamos tolerated his antics, or never
considered him a security risk.  (Feynman says Kemeny, the co-inventor of
BASIC, was so subjected on account of his parent's background).  I would
think tampering with all the safes would have blown Groves' temper bigger
than the bomb itself.  Groves wanted to lock up Szilard, an equally
brilliant physicist.



Sat, 05 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?


Quote:

>>I'm just being silly here...but if you had to pick a single person who
>>would be your favorite computer person (ie inventor like Herman Hollerith
>>or Eckert & Machuley, or businessmen like Thomas Watson Jr & Sr, or
>>whoem), who would you pick?

>Dr. Frederick Brooks, author of "the Mythical Man Month."

>Every idea in that book is 100% applicable today, even though the
>book dates from the mainframe era.

Bob, this *is* the mainframe era.

Cory Hamasaki  Kiyo Design, Inc     http://www.kiyoinc.com
HHResearch Co. 11 Annapolis St.     OS/2 Webstore & Newsletter
REDWOOD        Annapolis, Md, 21401 (410) 280-1942



Sun, 06 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:

> > Hope you find the above interesting,
> > Bill {*filter*}

> PS: It was the 650 which had the 10,000 word drum memory, not the 701.
> Sorry about that.

> Bill (red faced)

The 650, and other machines with the next instruction address in the
current instruction, were built that way so that you could optimize
the access to the drum. That required you to figure out how long the
current operation would take. SOAP was the system for the 650. We
had one on the UCLA campus in 1958 at the Western Data Processing
Center (WDPC) joint venture with IBM. It was located in a building
attached to the Graduate School of Business.

WDPC was also the home of the commercialized version of Direct
Couple (original version by Simson and Crabtree at NASA
Houston) with a 7044/7094, ASP (later JES3) with a 40 driving
a 65, WDCOM based on an IBM 7740 communications processor that
preceeded the 2701/2/3, and Computer Assisted Instruction using
the WDCOM front end for a 1410 back end.

The 650 in 1957, was followed by the 1410, 7094, 7044,
360/40 (3rd ever shipped), 7740, 1620, 1130, 1978, 7701,
7702 and so on. Full of history.

The merger of WDPC with the engineering facility produced the
Office of Academic Computing. That was right after the engineering
facility hooked a 40 up to an 1800 for the first IBM APT processor.
More history.

The Honeywell IMPs were tested there. So was the first ARPANet
work. And so on and so on....



Sun, 06 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:

> > Hope you find the above interesting,
> > Bill {*filter*}

> PS: It was the 650 which had the 10,000 word drum memory, not the 701.
> Sorry about that.

> Bill (red faced)

The 650, and other machines with the next instruction address in the
current instruction, were built that way so that you could optimize
the access to the drum. That required you to figure out how long the
current operation would take. SOAP was the system for the 650. We
had one on the UCLA campus in 1958 at the Western Data Processing
Center (WDPC) joint venture with IBM. It was located in a building
attached to the Graduate School of Business.

WDPC was also the home of the commercialized version of Direct
Couple (original version by Simson and Crabtree at NASA
Houston) with a 7044/7094, ASP (later JES3) with a 40 driving
a 65, WDCOM based on an IBM 7740 communications processor that
preceeded the 2701/2/3, and Computer Assisted Instruction using
the WDCOM front end for a 1410 back end.

The 650 in 1957, was followed by the 1410, 7094, 7044,
360/40 (3rd ever shipped), 7740, 1620, 1130, 1978, 7701,
7702 and so on. Full of history.

The merger of WDPC with the engineering facility produced the
Office of Academic Computing. That was right after the engineering
facility hooked a 40 up to an 1800 for the first IBM APT processor.
More history.

The Honeywell IMPs were tested there. So was the first ARPANet
work. And so on and so on....



Sun, 06 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

Quote:

> Second point concerns the IBM 650 - I participated in a summer program
> in 1958 which included 2 weeks programming IBM's latest & greatest at
> their Hartford (Conn) Datacenter - it was a 650.

Now way; the 704 was a much more powerfull machine. The advantage of the
650 was its low price.

Quote:
> It had a 10,000
> word drum memory, 10 char/word, and part of each instruction was the
> address of the next instruction (i.e., it wasn't automatically the next
> word). Thus, it wasn't a true computer according to the von Neuman
> model.

The 650 had a two thousand word memory, with 10 digit words. The entry
model had a one thousand word memory. Maybe you're thinking of 10,000
digits, which would match the entry model.

I don't recall von Neuman ever specifying that instruction flow had to
be
consecutive. Certainly everyone that I know who programmed the 650
considered it to be a von Neuman machine.

Quote:
> I would vote for someone like Alan Turing, Babbidge, von Neuman, maybe
> Grace Hopper, Ada (Lady Byron?) or John someone (from IBM, who came up
> with ForTran) on the software side.

John Backus (sp?)

Quote:
> Bill {*filter*}

--

                        Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz
                        Senior Software SE

The values in from and reply-to are for the benefit of spammers:
reply to domain eds.com, user msustys1.smetz or to domain gsg.eds.com,
user smetz.



Sun, 06 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

(big snip)

Quote:
> Two points, Watson Sr's business practices also included:

>         a. buying up & destroying used equipment;
>         b. refusing to sell equipment outright

> The point was to control the marketplace by eliminating a secondary
> market for used equipment. In the (in)famous 1956 Consent Decree IBM
> denied any wrongdoing and agreed not to do it anymore (which, I
> understand, is typical for a consent decree).

> Second point concerns the IBM 650 - I participated in a summer program
> in 1958 which included 2 weeks programming IBM's latest & greatest at
> their Hartford (Conn) Datacenter - it was a 650. I don't believe it had
> been on the market for very long. IBM's first commercially available
> computer was the IBM 701, announced in 1951 (I think). It had a 10,000
> word drum memory, 10 char/word, and part of each instruction was the
> address of the next instruction (i.e., it wasn't automatically the next
> word). Thus, it wasn't a true computer according to the von Neuman
> model.

> I would vote for someone like Alan Turing, Babbidge, von Neuman, maybe
> Grace Hopper, Ada (Lady Byron?) or John someone (from IBM, who came up
> with ForTran) on the software side. Watson, Jr. & other IBM executives
> had to shanghai the company away from Watson, Sr., who believe the
> entire country needed only 6-12 computers around the USA to which
> scientists could bring their data for computation - he believed IBM's
> future lay in punched card equipment.

> Hope you find the above interesting,
> Bill {*filter*}

PS: It was the 650 which had the 10,000 word drum memory, not the 701.
Sorry about that.

Bill (red faced)



Sun, 06 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Your favorite computer trading card?

The usual distinction is between von Neumann machines and Harvard machines,
where Harvard machines have separate instruction and data space.

The sequential instruction execution is probably useful for patent law,
but not for is/isn't a computer.  It is common in the microprogramming
world do have microinstructions address the next instruction.  

-- glen



Tue, 08 Feb 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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