Predictions? 
Author Message
 Predictions?

Quote:
> Count yourself lucky. The teletypes I first worked with used 5-bit
> baudot. 32 different characters does not get you very far so they had
> "letters" and "figures" shift keys.

I believe the Bell System used these teletypes for I/O to their early
relay computers.

Was there any other significant use of 5 bit teletypes for computer I/O?



Mon, 09 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Predictions?

Quote:
>> Count yourself lucky. The teletypes I first worked with used 5-bit
>> baudot. 32 different characters does not get you very far so they had
>> "letters" and "figures" shift keys.

> I believe the Bell System used these teletypes for I/O to their early
> relay computers.

> Was there any other significant use of 5 bit teletypes for computer I/O?

At least as late as 1979, J C Penney in Southern California was using 5-bit
baudot-coded paper tape for point-of-sale data from four of its stores.

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Mon, 09 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Predictions?

Quote:

>> Count yourself lucky. The teletypes I first worked with used 5-bit
>> baudot. 32 different characters does not get you very far so they had
>> "letters" and "figures" shift keys.

>I believe the Bell System used these teletypes for I/O to their early
>relay computers.

>Was there any other significant use of 5 bit teletypes for computer I/O?

A well-known ATC organisation followed the FAA in using S/360, then S/370
machines as the main flight data processors/databases. The flight strip
printers (FSP), up until a couple of years ago, were electro-mechanical
beasts which were driven by PTT.  A remote flight data entry and FSP system
(also using electro-mechanical keyboards/printers and really archaic comms
units) used 110Baud MCVFT channels with PTT code. Although the system has
been upgraded to use modern FSPs and remote data entry terminals and
printers, they still use the PTT code. More recently, peripherals which
require the same data, but in ASCII, have been added. The result is I/O
translate tables which convert from EBCDIC to PTT, and often then into ASCII
(and of course the reverse process is needed for input) to drive the
peripherals. It can get quite messy, but that's one of the problems with
trying to protect investment in legacy code.


Thu, 12 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Predictions?
What is PTT?


Thu, 12 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Predictions?
 >
 > What is PTT?

I believe it means Post, Telephone, Telegraph.  In European countries at
least these three facilities are owned/controlled by the government.  I
suppose it is equivqlent to our (USA) USPS, all the various telephone
companies and perhaps Western Union.

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Thu, 12 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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