Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?! 
Author Message
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Okay folks, here's one for you.  I have created a
database for my job that has grown considerably
since I started it a month an a half ago.  I have
been using sites like this, and Dev Ashish's(SP?
Sorry) web site to make the database as User
Friendly and as automated as possible.  I have
gotten a lot of things to work great, and right
now, a poorly trained monkey can operate the
database.  However, fixing bugs, and making
changes to the database is becoming a HUGE brain
cramp!  I am sure there has to be a way to do
what I have been planning on for the past few
days, but for the life of me, I can't figure out
how to do it!  Here's my plan, I want to create a
table that records EACH and EVERY time that a
database object has been changed.  Not the
records, but the forms, tables, queries, etc.
This way, nothing will be entered into that table
when the users are online, but when I get on, and
begin messing with the database internals, I have
an easy source to see what I have messed with
lately!  The other reason that I want this
function, is that I am going to document the
entire database soon, and I want to be able to
update that document in portions, only printing
off database objects that were changed.  (The
full documentation has to be close to 2000 pages
by now, if not more).  Any help with this
'project' would be greatly appreciated!

Drew

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Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Sat, 19 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
Hi,

maybe using Visual Safe Source? Only the interfacing comes with ODE (Access
97), it is available alone or in Visual Studio.

Hoping it may help,
Vanderghast, Access MVP.

Quote:

> Okay folks, here's one for you.  I have created a
> database for my job that has grown considerably
> since I started it a month an a half ago.  I have
> been using sites like this, and Dev Ashish's(SP?
> Sorry) web site to make the database as User
> Friendly and as automated as possible.  I have
> gotten a lot of things to work great, and right
> now, a poorly trained monkey can operate the
> database.  However, fixing bugs, and making
> changes to the database is becoming a HUGE brain
> cramp!  I am sure there has to be a way to do
> what I have been planning on for the past few
> days, but for the life of me, I can't figure out
> how to do it!  Here's my plan, I want to create a
> table that records EACH and EVERY time that a
> database object has been changed.  Not the
> records, but the forms, tables, queries, etc.
> This way, nothing will be entered into that table
> when the users are online, but when I get on, and
> begin messing with the database internals, I have
> an easy source to see what I have messed with
> lately!  The other reason that I want this
> function, is that I am going to document the
> entire database soon, and I want to be able to
> update that document in portions, only printing
> off database objects that were changed.  (The
> full documentation has to be close to 2000 pages
> by now, if not more).  Any help with this
> 'project' would be greatly appreciated!

> Drew

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Sun, 20 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
Visual Source Safe, that's part of the Developer software right?
Assuming that it would be near impossible to get my company to buy that
for me, any other ideas?



Quote:
> Hi,

> maybe using Visual Safe Source? Only the interfacing comes with ODE
(Access
> 97), it is available alone or in Visual Studio.

> Hoping it may help,
> Vanderghast, Access MVP.




Quote:
> > Okay folks, here's one for you.  I have created a
> > database for my job that has grown considerably
> > since I started it a month an a half ago.  I have
> > been using sites like this, and Dev Ashish's(SP?
> > Sorry) web site to make the database as User
> > Friendly and as automated as possible.  I have
> > gotten a lot of things to work great, and right
> > now, a poorly trained monkey can operate the
> > database.  However, fixing bugs, and making
> > changes to the database is becoming a HUGE brain
> > cramp!  I am sure there has to be a way to do
> > what I have been planning on for the past few
> > days, but for the life of me, I can't figure out
> > how to do it!  Here's my plan, I want to create a
> > table that records EACH and EVERY time that a
> > database object has been changed.  Not the
> > records, but the forms, tables, queries, etc.
> > This way, nothing will be entered into that table
> > when the users are online, but when I get on, and
> > begin messing with the database internals, I have
> > an easy source to see what I have messed with
> > lately!  The other reason that I want this
> > function, is that I am going to document the
> > entire database soon, and I want to be able to
> > update that document in portions, only printing
> > off database objects that were changed.  (The
> > full documentation has to be close to 2000 pages
> > by now, if not more).  Any help with this
> > 'project' would be greatly appreciated!

> > Drew

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Sun, 20 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:
>Visual Source Safe, that's part of the Developer software right?
>Assuming that it would be near impossible to get my company to buy that
>for me, any other ideas?

If you *really* need the amount of detail you asked for then you either
waste months learning and implementing or you talk the boss into
spending about 100 bucks on the Developer kit.

Being more realistic I suggest that you keep a record (written or
manually keyed Db table) as you go of all the changes you make. In
addition to this try looking at the MsysObjects system table. It shows
creation and last changed dates for all the objects in a Db. You need to
use the database options to make the system tables visible, but having
done that you can create a query that shows all changed objects since a
given date.

As far as the documenter goes, you really should be selective about what
you print out, otherwise it rapidly gets unusable.
--
Albert Marshall



Sun, 20 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
Question, what do you mean that it gets rapidly Unusable when you
document your database?

Also, I work for a pretty convoluted beuaracracy, and though I could
probably get them to get the developer software, I don't feel like
taking the MONTHS it would take to get it out of my life.  I think I
will look into the MSysObjects idea.  Thanks.



Quote:

> >Visual Source Safe, that's part of the Developer software right?
> >Assuming that it would be near impossible to get my company to buy
that
> >for me, any other ideas?

> If you *really* need the amount of detail you asked for then you
either
> waste months learning and implementing or you talk the boss into
> spending about 100 bucks on the Developer kit.

> Being more realistic I suggest that you keep a record (written or
> manually keyed Db table) as you go of all the changes you make. In
> addition to this try looking at the MsysObjects system table. It shows
> creation and last changed dates for all the objects in a Db. You need
to
> use the database options to make the system tables visible, but having
> done that you can create a query that shows all changed objects since
a
> given date.

> As far as the documenter goes, you really should be selective about
what
> you print out, otherwise it rapidly gets unusable.
> --
> Albert Marshall

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Sun, 20 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:
>Question, what do you mean that it gets rapidly Unusable when you
>document your database?

The phrase "information overload" springs to mind. Try running
documenter on a a few sample forms and reports. If you don't use the
options to restrict the information it gathers you will have huge
amounts of data to wade through to find the important stuff.

For an example, I remember a fairly simple database with about a dozen
forms and 20 or so reports that filled three thick ring binders because
the client wanted "full documentation. It looks impressive, but it's
pretty well nigh useless for maintaining a database.

Quote:
>Also, I work for a pretty convoluted beuaracracy, and though I could
>probably get them to get the developer software, I don't feel like
>taking the MONTHS it would take to get it out of my life.  I think I
>will look into the MSysObjects idea.  Thanks.

Are all your users equipped with licensed copies of Office? Next time
you need to add a user try asking for the developer edition, instead of
plain Office Professional. Depending on signing authority limits it
should be feasible and it will add about $100 to the price.

--
Albert Marshall



Mon, 21 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
Everyone that uses the database has Office 97, but as far as the
'documentation overload' that is actually my idea, and here's the
plan.  If I document EVERYTHING, and then change the documentation, if
something every went wrong, and I was unable to recover something, then
the documentation would be there to be a standby copy of the code.  I
know that full documentation is gonna take quite a while to print off,
but even though the beauracracy doesn't want to spend money on new
software, they love to see paper used in LARGE amounts.  The other
reason for the documentation is that if I were to leave, for some
reason, then they have a hard copy of how I set the database up, and
can refer to that instead of going into the database itself, running
the risk of screwing things up by accident.  (Of course the database
backs itself up every week, if it hasn't been backed up my me within
that week.  So documentation is just over doing things.)



Quote:

> >Question, what do you mean that it gets rapidly Unusable when you
> >document your database?

> The phrase "information overload" springs to mind. Try running
> documenter on a a few sample forms and reports. If you don't use the
> options to restrict the information it gathers you will have huge
> amounts of data to wade through to find the important stuff.

> For an example, I remember a fairly simple database with about a dozen
> forms and 20 or so reports that filled three thick ring binders
because
> the client wanted "full documentation. It looks impressive, but it's
> pretty well nigh useless for maintaining a database.

> >Also, I work for a pretty convoluted beuaracracy, and though I could
> >probably get them to get the developer software, I don't feel like
> >taking the MONTHS it would take to get it out of my life.  I think I
> >will look into the MSysObjects idea.  Thanks.

> Are all your users equipped with licensed copies of Office? Next time
> you need to add a user try asking for the developer edition, instead
of
> plain Office Professional. Depending on signing authority limits it
> should be feasible and it will add about $100 to the price.

> --
> Albert Marshall

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Mon, 21 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:
>Everyone that uses the database has Office 97, but as far as the
>'documentation overload' that is actually my idea, and here's the
>plan.  If I document EVERYTHING, and then change the documentation, if
>something every went wrong, and I was unable to recover something, then
>the documentation would be there to be a standby copy of the code.  

I'm a full-time professional Access developer. If someone came to me
with a full printout of everything the documenter produces to rebuild
the database I'd either run away or double my hourly rate.

Just keep an archive copy of every major revision you ever do, plus
copious notes about any unusual bits.

Also learn to comment your code properly. It makes maintenance much
easier.

--
Albert Marshall



Mon, 21 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
Commenting the code is something I have only done a half-a**ed job
with. I am really not a programmer, my Dad worked for IBM up until a
few years ago when he went to Texas Instruments, so I as far back as I
can remember there was always a computer in the house.  I remember the
old IBM 50100's, boy were those monsters.  However I am really
mechanically inclined, and that is what I prefer to do for a living.
So I actually work at Dallas Fort/Worth International Airport, as a
mechanic in the plant that supplies Chill water and other services to
the whole airport.  Well our maintenance department only has one other
computer literate person, and he is the other admin user on the
database, even though he hasn't done anything yet.  I have never even
seen Microsoft access before the middle of June this year, and I just
started making this thing.  I try to comment in the code as much as I
can, but since I am going by trial and error, I end up getting ticked
off and just write what works sometimes! hehehehe  Anyways, the airport
is a HUGE papermill and my higher up boss wants the documentation so he
can impress everyone, which is fine by me, I just have to keep adding
paper to the printer as it works.  But I just think it would make it a
little less pointless if I actually keep the documentation updated!!!
Anyways, I have been busy with a few minor alterations in the startup
process, it now records not only the Users Database name, but also the
Network system name, which then converts the network system name into a
real first and last name.  Then when the administrators log on we have
a form that will display a relatively real time log of who's online.
Tonight, and through the weekend I am gonna look into the MSysObjects
table.  Thanks for the help



Quote:

> >Everyone that uses the database has Office 97, but as far as the
> >'documentation overload' that is actually my idea, and here's the
> >plan.  If I document EVERYTHING, and then change the documentation,
if
> >something every went wrong, and I was unable to recover something,
then
> >the documentation would be there to be a standby copy of the code.

> I'm a full-time professional Access developer. If someone came to me
> with a full printout of everything the documenter produces to rebuild
> the database I'd either run away or double my hourly rate.

> Just keep an archive copy of every major revision you ever do, plus
> copious notes about any unusual bits.

> Also learn to comment your code properly. It makes maintenance much
> easier.

> --
> Albert Marshall

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Mon, 21 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:

>I remember the old IBM 50100's, boy were those monsters.  

Do you mean the IBM 5110s?  Built in about 1978 to 1981 or so?   A
unit containg the 4"x6" 64x16 character screen and builtin keyboard.
With 2 8" external floppy drives about the size of a 2 high filing
cabinet?

Lots of fun.  <smile>  

The above, 32 kb of Ram and a 120 cps printer cost $25K CAD.

Tony
----
Message posted to newsgroup and, if appropriate, emailed.
Tony Toews, Independent Computer Consultant
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
   http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
VolStar http://www.volstar.com Manage hundreds or
   thousands of volunteers for special events.



Fri, 01 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
I don't remember ours having floppy drives, the 'disks' for that
computer were more like clear VHS tapes.  But that was how big the
screen was, in the good old black and white.  I used to love playing
some of those games, including a star trek one, which I found an ega
version of a few years ago.  If anyone remembers that old star trek
game, where you could scan around, and find out how many planets and
klingons were in the nearby sectors, give a holler and I'll try to find
the website that had the EGA version! ehhehe



Quote:

> >I remember the old IBM 50100's, boy were those monsters.

> Do you mean the IBM 5110s?  Built in about 1978 to 1981 or so?   A
> unit containg the 4"x6" 64x16 character screen and builtin keyboard.
> With 2 8" external floppy drives about the size of a 2 high filing
> cabinet?

> Lots of fun.  <smile>

> The above, 32 kb of Ram and a 120 cps printer cost $25K CAD.

> Tony
> ----
> Message posted to newsgroup and, if appropriate, emailed.
> Tony Toews, Independent Computer Consultant
> Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
>    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
> VolStar http://www.volstar.com Manage hundreds or
>    thousands of volunteers for special events.

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Fri, 01 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:
>I don't remember ours having floppy drives, the 'disks' for that
>computer were more like clear VHS tapes.  But that was how big the
>screen was, in the good old black and white.  I used to love playing
>some of those games, including a star trek one, which I found an ega
>version of a few years ago.  If anyone remembers that old star trek
>game, where you could scan around, and find out how many planets and
>klingons were in the nearby sectors, give a holler and I'll try to find
>the website that had the EGA version! ehhehe

Screen? Screen???!

I started my computer graphics career with a PDP11, a teletype for input
and a line printer for output.

You had to do your own garbage collection to get enough contiguous bytes
on the removable hard disk to run the program.
--
Albert Marshall



Fri, 01 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!
hehehe, my Dad made a computer when he was in college, called it the
Kim computer, it had a Red LCD display, with like 8 digits, that was
it's entire display.  Give me a break, I am only 26, so I don't
remember back as far as you! hehehehe



Quote:

> >I don't remember ours having floppy drives, the 'disks' for that
> >computer were more like clear VHS tapes.  But that was how big the
> >screen was, in the good old black and white.  I used to love playing
> >some of those games, including a star trek one, which I found an ega
> >version of a few years ago.  If anyone remembers that old star trek
> >game, where you could scan around, and find out how many planets and
> >klingons were in the nearby sectors, give a holler and I'll try to
find
> >the website that had the EGA version! ehhehe

> Screen? Screen???!

> I started my computer graphics career with a PDP11, a teletype for
input
> and a line printer for output.

> You had to do your own garbage collection to get enough contiguous
bytes
> on the removable hard disk to run the program.
> --
> Albert Marshall

--
He who learns but does not think is lost, he who thinks but does not lea

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Fri, 01 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Keeping Track of Database Modifications?!?!

Quote:

>I don't remember ours having floppy drives, the 'disks' for that
>computer were more like clear VHS tapes.  But that was how big the
>screen was, in the good old black and white.

Ah, you mean the IBM 5100, the predecessor to the IBM 5110.  I only
saw it once fortunately.  It was just a little before my time.

Quote:
> If anyone remembers that old star trek
>game, where you could scan around, and find out how many planets and
>klingons were in the nearby sectors, give a holler and I'll try to find
>the website that had the EGA version! ehhehe

I remember that game!  Hmmm, it was ported to the IBM S/34 as well.
Dunno what language though. Likely RPG.  <guffaw>  

Tony
----
Message posted to newsgroup and, if appropriate, emailed.
Tony Toews, Independent Computer Consultant
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
   http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
VolStar http://www.volstar.com Manage hundreds or
   thousands of volunteers for special events.



Tue, 05 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 14 post ] 

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